Jim's Beer Kit

Practical Homebrewing

Beaverdale Barolo

For any brew that doesn't fit into any of the above categories!

Beaverdale Barolo

Postby modofodo » Wed May 19, 2010 10:43 am

Any comments on this one?

I normally make fruit, flower and tea based wines (cheap) but thought I'd treat myself to a more refined kit. I wanted to get the Beaverdale Vieux Chateau du Roi (but they had none at TTS). I opted for the Barolo in it's place - TTS said they would get some of the other in.
Fermenting: St Peter Ruby Red, Cal. Conn. Zinfandel Blush
Drinking: WN1, 09 Elderberry, 09 Sloe.
modofodo
Steady Drinker
 
Posts: 42
Joined: Tue May 18, 2010 9:05 pm

Re: Beaverdale Barolo

Postby Hawkinspm » Wed May 19, 2010 10:45 am

Ahh nice, I want to try one of those, good to hear they are getting one in.
User avatar
Hawkinspm
Piss Artist
 
Posts: 226
Joined: Mon Nov 17, 2008 5:01 pm

Re: Beaverdale Barolo

Postby modofodo » Tue May 25, 2010 6:07 pm

Beaverdale Vieux Chateau du Roi is instock at TTS - got mine today and just remembered you wanted one!
Fermenting: St Peter Ruby Red, Cal. Conn. Zinfandel Blush
Drinking: WN1, 09 Elderberry, 09 Sloe.
modofodo
Steady Drinker
 
Posts: 42
Joined: Tue May 18, 2010 9:05 pm

Re: Beaverdale Barolo

Postby Spikesdad » Tue May 25, 2010 6:23 pm

'our girt' did one a while back... bloody bootifull!!

I dont think you will be dis appointed
User avatar
Spikesdad
Drunk as a Skunk
 
Posts: 788
Joined: Wed Oct 07, 2009 9:46 am
Location: Batley, West Yorks

Re: Beaverdale Barolo

Postby sparky Paul » Tue May 25, 2010 8:53 pm

Barolo is fab if you like a rich, very full bodied red - it is a unique wine IMHO, and one of my favourites, but it benefits a great deal from a long cellaring. I don't think you would be disappointed drinking it young, but if you can keep your hands off it for a year or so, the change is remarkable. The Beaverdale version is very good, but I reckon the Kenridge Classic Barolo kit just pips it.

Beaverdale Chateau du Roi is superb.
"Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated." - Confucius
User avatar
sparky Paul
Even further under the Table
 
Posts: 2870
Joined: Tue Nov 21, 2006 10:52 am
Location: Nottinghamshire, UK

Re: Beaverdale Barolo

Postby Hoodlum » Tue May 25, 2010 9:59 pm

The Beaverdale Barolo is utterly excellent in my book; well worth doing.

I tended to keep mine for a year also before drinking them.
FV1, FV2,
Cornies - Coopers IPA, Brewbuddy bitter, Extract Brew - Connor's Clout (Boddies clone), Aaron's Ale - AG similar to a more hoppy pint of DIrectors, Cooper's Stout,
Next up -More Coopers IPA, Coopers Lager, Rayments AG (When I get the recipe!), Geordie Bitter, Rioja 30 bottle kit
Wines - 18 bottles of rather nice Barolo
Hoodlum
Hollow Legs
 
Posts: 334
Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2009 2:24 pm

Re: Beaverdale Barolo

Postby modofodo » Tue May 25, 2010 11:30 pm

Great to hear the positive reviews of the Beaverdale kits - I was hoping they would be a good choice! I like a nice Châteauneuf-du-Pape so was excited to learn of the existence of the Chateau Du Roi. I also like heavy reds so the Barolo sounds ideal. I will be able to resist the temptation and lay them down for as long as it takes. This is my first venture into decent kit territory, I know they are by no means top of the range but they are a bit more plush than my normal brews.

I started off the Barolo this evening - only trouble now is maintaining a steady temperature. Always a challenge in this house ;) Also might need to hang around the recycling to bag some more empty bottles :lol:
Fermenting: St Peter Ruby Red, Cal. Conn. Zinfandel Blush
Drinking: WN1, 09 Elderberry, 09 Sloe.
modofodo
Steady Drinker
 
Posts: 42
Joined: Tue May 18, 2010 9:05 pm

Re: Beaverdale Barolo

Postby sparky Paul » Wed May 26, 2010 9:44 am

modofodo wrote:I will be able to resist the temptation and lay them down for as long as it takes. This is my first venture into decent kit territory, I know they are by no means top of the range but they are a bit more plush than my normal brews.

I know how hard it is to keep your mitts off them, so don't feel guilty about drinking some straight away... however, aim to keep a few for as long as possible, you will see how the flavours develop and change.

The varietal kits around the £35-45 mark are a world away from the budget kits, you will be rewarded by wines which are really very good by any standard. If you wanted to find a retail wine of comparable quality, you would undoubtedly have to pay more than the usual £4-5 dross pumped out by the supermarkets.

The £100+ kits make wines of the very highest quality, but the differences are far more subtle, just as with the most expensive bottles of wine. The Beaverdale and Kenridge Classic kits are really excellent value for money, IMHO.
"Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated." - Confucius
User avatar
sparky Paul
Even further under the Table
 
Posts: 2870
Joined: Tue Nov 21, 2006 10:52 am
Location: Nottinghamshire, UK

Re: Beaverdale Barolo

Postby Hawkinspm » Wed May 26, 2010 10:09 am

Sounds good, now I may have to try both... think it's time to invest in a large wine fermenter to do 30 bottle kits. I have been trying a couple out in demijohns to see if I thought they were worth the investment, pretty happy so far with results and they are still young.. :D
User avatar
Hawkinspm
Piss Artist
 
Posts: 226
Joined: Mon Nov 17, 2008 5:01 pm


Return to Other Brews

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests