Search found 245 matches

by mabrungard
Tue Jan 08, 2019 4:55 am
Forum: Brewing Liquor
Topic: Sudden problems predicting mash pH
Replies: 34
Views: 2162

Re: Sudden problems predicting mash pH

Mash pH increases throughout the mashing duration. Through a large number of mashing trials and a review of my previous brewing results, I now know that pH increases by about 0.2 and 0.4 units in the period between the 15 minute and 45 minute pH measurements. Therefore, don't rely on the 15 minute r...
by mabrungard
Sat Jan 05, 2019 3:57 am
Forum: Brewing Liquor
Topic: Sudden problems predicting mash pH
Replies: 34
Views: 2162

Re: Sudden problems predicting mash pH

Have you changed your mashing thickness? If you've moved to a thinner mash, that does affect mashing pH and I can report that current versions of Bru'n Water do not predict pH very well when the mash thickness is thinner than about 4 liter/kg. There is testing and recalibration currently being condu...
by mabrungard
Wed Sep 12, 2018 1:31 pm
Forum: Brewing Liquor
Topic: Old Peculiar - Water profile
Replies: 9
Views: 1129

Re: Old Peculiar - Water profile

Coal is a strong contributor of sulfate in groundwater and the Yorkshire area is riddled with mines and coal. The admission of high sulfate is accurate. Sulfate doesn't make beer bitter, but it does dry the beer's finish. That would be very welcome in a huge malty beer like Old Peculiar.
by mabrungard
Fri Jul 20, 2018 2:06 pm
Forum: Grain Brewing
Topic: Strange pH readings in mash
Replies: 16
Views: 1274

Re: Strange pH readings in mash

As already mentioned, water pH is a poor predictor for mashing pH response. It is water alkalinity that drives mashing pH. In a grist with little crystal or roast content, it will need to have a surplus of H+ protons in it to consume the buffering that is a natural part of the pale grist. In fact, i...
by mabrungard
Thu May 17, 2018 5:57 pm
Forum: Grain Brewing
Topic: Epsom and gypsum after boil or before?
Replies: 10
Views: 1007

Re: Epsom and gypsum after boil or before?

Adding either of those salts to your water is fine, but be sure to limit the resulting magnesium content if you're going to use Epsom. Since most mashes need a bit of acid to help bring the mash pH down, its more beneficial to add those salts to the water prior to mashing. They will help depress the...
by mabrungard
Thu May 17, 2018 5:54 pm
Forum: Grain Brewing
Topic: Water profile for Bohemian Pilsner
Replies: 10
Views: 1403

Re: Water profile for Bohemian Pilsner

Yeast most definitely don't require calcium in the water to ferment well. Malt supplies all the calcium the yeast need for their metabolism. However, there are reasons to add calcium salts to water. For ales, having more than 50 ppm calcium is helpful for getting the beer to clarify reasonably quick...
by mabrungard
Fri Dec 01, 2017 2:23 pm
Forum: Grain Brewing
Topic: Saflager W-34/70
Replies: 7
Views: 1041

Re: Saflager W-34/70

I recently brewed an Alt with 34/70 and fermented at around 60F, hoping to add a bit of esters to the brew. But the result was virtually as clean as this yeast produces at 50F. It seems to be a very tolerant lager yeast.
by mabrungard
Mon Nov 06, 2017 9:53 pm
Forum: Brewing Liquor
Topic: Water Analyses and Treatment
Replies: 12
Views: 2668

Re: Water Analyses and Treatment

There is nothing wrong with keeping your water treatment uncomplicated. The problem is that its difficult to understand and alter your brewing liquor if you don't know or understand what's in it. Add to that, the fact that some brewer's water quality varies. Now its hair-pulling time! For those with...
by mabrungard
Sat Jul 01, 2017 2:03 pm
Forum: Beer Recipes
Topic: First Lager advice water treatment ?
Replies: 8
Views: 762

Re: First Lager advice water treatment ?

Pre-boiling your tap water, letting it settle, and decanting the clear water off, is a decent beginner's water treatment. That can get you part of the way to where you might need to be. But to get to even better results, you will need to learn to use an acid to further tune your water for the batch ...
by mabrungard
Sat Jul 01, 2017 1:53 pm
Forum: Grain Brewing
Topic: Harsh bitter Taste at end of flavour profile
Replies: 46
Views: 4287

Re: Harsh bitter Taste at end of flavour profile

It doesn't appear that you are doing anything about your water's alkalinity and managing the pH of your wort. High wort pH that arises from using alkaline mashing and sparging water will result in higher beer pH and that can dull the beer flavor and impart harsh flavors. I invite you to review the W...
by mabrungard
Sun Sep 18, 2016 1:51 am
Forum: Brewing Liquor
Topic: Trying to hit London Water profile
Replies: 13
Views: 2362

Re: Trying to hit London Water profile

I wouldn't use the London profile in Bru'n Water to brew a Porter. It is more representative of water from the Thames. I'll add a bit more history to water resources in London since I performed an extensive research project on the subject. Please be aware that this discussion is on the location of o...
by mabrungard
Sat Aug 06, 2016 3:33 am
Forum: Brewing Equipment
Topic: Rust on element
Replies: 14
Views: 917

Re: Rust on element

My heating elements often had iron staining on their end cap. I solved it by coating that area with Silicone rubber to isolate it from the water or wort. I've had no problems since. I do find that its not a permanent fix since I do have to recoat every year or two. You don't need special heat-resist...
by mabrungard
Mon Jul 25, 2016 2:37 am
Forum: Grain Brewing
Topic: Dilution vs CRS help for hefe
Replies: 18
Views: 920

Re: Dilution vs CRS help for hefe

Do you have any data to back this up Martin? It would be interesting to see what tests have been done with regards to calcium losses from different acids and how much is precipitated out. The data on calcium precipitation due to phosphoric acid addition is presented in Palmer and Kaminski's book on...
by mabrungard
Fri Jul 22, 2016 2:44 am
Forum: Grain Brewing
Topic: Dilution vs CRS help for hefe
Replies: 18
Views: 920

Re: Dilution vs CRS help for hefe

Phosphoric acid can only precipitate calcium out of solution if the calcium concentration is already high. Under that condition, there is NO penalty in loosing calcium. In fact, you can brew very good beers without any calcium in your brewing water since the malt supplies all the calcium that the ye...
by mabrungard
Wed Jul 20, 2016 1:30 am
Forum: Grain Brewing
Topic: Dilution vs CRS help for hefe
Replies: 18
Views: 920

Re: Dilution vs CRS help for hefe

In my opinion, German styles should always be made with some form of lactic acid. CRS is not ideal for those styles. Many German waters have modest mineralization and the boost in sulfate and chloride delivered by CRS may be uncharacteristic for those styles. Given your reported alkalinity, you shou...