Search found 4852 matches

by Aleman
Fri Jun 01, 2018 1:15 pm
Forum: Brewing Liquor
Topic: Sulphuric & Hydrochloric
Replies: 11
Views: 1034

Re: Sulphuric & Hydrochloric

Just use AMS, it’s food grade and easily available. The dosage calculations are already done for you, in addition to how much chloride and sulphate it adds. https://www.murphyandson.co.uk/Datasheets/AMS.pdf If your objective is to make beer, certainly so. If you wish to explore brewing in greater d...
by Aleman
Mon Apr 02, 2018 10:23 am
Forum: Brewing Liquor
Topic: Lager - I don't get it?
Replies: 8
Views: 1633

Re: Lager - I don't get it?

I find lagers (pilsners) brewed with low levels of calcium do not clear well even with 12 weeks plus of cold lagering, they also taste a bit meh. Add 75mg of calcium (as a 1:1 or 1:2 sulphate to chloride ratio) and all of a sudden the beer shines, same recipe, same method, same hop batch, same yeast...
by Aleman
Tue Feb 27, 2018 2:51 pm
Forum: Brewing Liquor
Topic: Splitting the treatments
Replies: 22
Views: 3481

Re: Splitting the treatments

Also take into account the oft debated point about mash pH readings being different at mash heat and room heat. Knock off .25 or .35 (depending on who you believe) from your room temp measurement and your already in the sports related stadium. <Rant Mode> Don't do this :roll: those that quote that ...
by Aleman
Tue Feb 27, 2018 11:40 am
Forum: Brewing Liquor
Topic: Splitting the treatments
Replies: 22
Views: 3481

Re: Splitting the treatments

One thing to add is that if you are BIAB then you need to ensure your starting alkalinity is actually lower than normally suggested for 3V. For 3V I aim for 20-25mg/L using a 'pale' grist, when I use the Braumeister it 's more like 12-15, so a 40-50% reduction above what is normally recommended.
by Aleman
Mon Feb 26, 2018 10:21 am
Forum: Grain Brewing
Topic: Mash pH woes and questions
Replies: 16
Views: 1521

Re: Mash pH woes and questions

Not enough Calcium! Take it to 150
by Aleman
Sun Feb 25, 2018 4:44 pm
Forum: Brewing Liquor
Topic: Splitting the treatments
Replies: 22
Views: 3481

Re: Splitting the treatments

I never add either! My take on it is sodium isn't needed for any brewing reactions so if I need to add chloride I may was well add calcium chloride as calcium is a beneficial brewing ion, Magnesium is a trace element so even if you water is low in it (mine varies between 2.1 and 6.4mg/l) there is go...
by Aleman
Sat Feb 24, 2018 1:23 pm
Forum: Brewing Liquor
Topic: Splitting the treatments
Replies: 22
Views: 3481

Re: Splitting the treatments

All my mash treatment salts go straight in the HLT and I then fill it, it's dissolved before full and no issues on heating. If you have a high level of calcium to start with you may have an issue getting gypsum to dissolve, but I've never noticed it. For my 'sparge liquor' treatment as I say I put i...
by Aleman
Fri Feb 23, 2018 8:14 am
Forum: Brewing Liquor
Topic: Splitting the treatments
Replies: 22
Views: 3481

Re: Splitting the treatments

The simple way is to split the salts addition 2/3 to the mash and 1/3 directly into the boiler just before running the sweet wort off. Treat the mash liquor to the alkalinity you have determined is appropriate for your beer style (colour), the sparge liquor should ALWAYS be low alkalinity (~20ppm) I...
by Aleman
Tue Feb 20, 2018 12:58 pm
Forum: Brewing Liquor
Topic: A total newbie to water treatment has some questions
Replies: 8
Views: 1356

Re: A total newbie to water treatment has some questions

1) WallyBrew ... Accept no alternatives! Except get yourself a Salifert Total Alkalinity Test kit. This means that you can measure your alkalinity on the day and adjust what you have not what was in the report (Costs £7-8 quid online). While a water report from your supplier may look as though it ha...
by Aleman
Thu Feb 15, 2018 8:33 am
Forum: Brewing Liquor
Topic: Another Salifert question
Replies: 27
Views: 3714

Re: Another Salifert question

Why calculate something from a water 'report' that has a limited number of readings, and describes an 'average' value along with min and max values (within the limited number of samples), when you can directly measure the actual value with a couple of tests that take around 5 minutes total. You know...
by Aleman
Wed Feb 14, 2018 10:02 pm
Forum: Brewing Liquor
Topic: Water Treatment Temperatures
Replies: 11
Views: 1727

Re: Water Treatment Temperatures

With the levels of ions you have, similar to my own, you don't necessarily need to reduce it down by too much ;). What I did with mine, was to do test mashes I could do 6 different ion levels with my 'standard' grists, and see what the pH was given the calcium and alkalinity levels, until I got the ...
by Aleman
Wed Feb 14, 2018 8:56 pm
Forum: Brewing Liquor
Topic: ooh look another water treatment question
Replies: 20
Views: 3208

Re: ooh look another water treatment question

Have you calibrated the meter? IIRC the voltcraft will do a 2 point calibration with buffers at pH7 and pH10 At what temperature did you measure the pH? Ideally room temp. IIRC at mash temps you take 0.3 from the pH reading so pH 5.5 and pH 5.6 When did you measure the pH? Ideally 10 minutes after m...
by Aleman
Wed Feb 14, 2018 8:46 pm
Forum: Brewing Liquor
Topic: Another Salifert question
Replies: 27
Views: 3714

Re: Another Salifert question

I don't have issues with what you are saying, merely the way you are saying it. The term hardness is confusing, mainly due to it's use on water reports where it's quoted "As CaCO3" inexperienced people see that and assume because they see the CaCO3 that it is alkalinity, and use that value incorrect...
by Aleman
Wed Feb 14, 2018 5:29 pm
Forum: Brewing Liquor
Topic: Water Treatment Temperatures
Replies: 11
Views: 1727

Re: Water Treatment Temperatures

It's chlorine you are getting rid of with the campden tablet not chloride, and yes it's fine using hot water, indeed the reaction is faster at warmer temperatures. Treatment salts can be added at any temperature, HOWEVER, calcium sulphate is, slightly, less soluble at warmer temperatures than it is ...
by Aleman
Wed Feb 14, 2018 2:41 pm
Forum: Brewing Liquor
Topic: Another Salifert question
Replies: 27
Views: 3714

Re: Another Salifert question

Aleman, Not sure what problems that you have with English Neither am I, but I'll just leave this here from your original post on this thread. Hardness is normally defined in terms of temporary and permanent hardness, which is usually assumed to be due to calcium and magnesium salts. In simple terms...