Search found 110 matches

by spook100
Thu Sep 08, 2011 4:26 pm
Forum: Grain Brewing
Topic: Sour Mashing
Replies: 7
Views: 569

Re: Sour Mashing

As a follow-up to the last post: after a few weeks in the keg the sourness seems to have mallowed somewhat; it's quite a nice beer and very drinkable now.
by spook100
Fri Aug 19, 2011 6:18 pm
Forum: Grain Brewing
Topic: Sour Mashing
Replies: 7
Views: 569

Re: Sour Mashing

Barney - The sourness was nice and clean due to keeping it withing the temperature range that lactobaccilus likes. I have read that if you let it drop much below 115f/46c then you get other souring agents coming in that give it a pretty nasty sourness, what the Americans call 'funk'. I tasted the fu...
by spook100
Fri Aug 19, 2011 5:17 pm
Forum: Grain Brewing
Topic: Sour Mashing
Replies: 7
Views: 569

Re: Sour Mashing

Yep, the sourness certainly did come back! Once the sugars had fermented out it came out as a genuine sour beer - more sour than I was aiming for but not unpalatable. I think I'll aim for a sour mash comprising around 15% of the total grain bill next time. I used a dry ale yeat for this one and the ...
by spook100
Thu Aug 11, 2011 5:05 pm
Forum: Brewing Equipment
Topic: Replacement Beer Engine Handles
Replies: 1
Views: 309

Replacement Beer Engine Handles

Hi
I want to replace the handles on some beer engines that I have. I have seen a number for sale on ebay but I have no way of telling whether they will be compatible with what I have. Does anyone know whether these handle have standard thread sizes, or does it vary by manufacturer?
Thanks
by spook100
Tue Jul 19, 2011 3:32 pm
Forum: Grain Brewing
Topic: Sweet n sickly
Replies: 11
Views: 643

Re: Sweet n sickly

It sounds like diacetyl to me. It's produced early in the fermentation and then cleaned up by the yeast later on, if your fermentation is healthy. Possibly caused by under-pitching or maybe you had a lethargic fermentation that hadn't finished doing its thing when you dropped the temperature after 8...
by spook100
Fri Jul 15, 2011 11:41 am
Forum: Grain Brewing
Topic: Sour Mashing
Replies: 7
Views: 569

Re: Sour Mashing

No input on this but I decided to give it a go anyway and post it here in case anyone might find it useful in future. To be conservative, I made up my sour mash comprising 10% of my total grain bill, let it cool to 115F/46C. I then innoculate with raw grain and purge the head space with CO2 before s...
by spook100
Tue Jul 05, 2011 10:30 am
Forum: Events
Topic: National Homebrew Competition - Bristol, September 3 2011
Replies: 143
Views: 13515

Re: National Homebrew Competition - Bristol, September 3 201

How are speciality beers judged if there are no set guidelines to follow. Does the entrant provide a description of what they were aiming for and get judged on that, or do the judges just go on whether they generally liked the beer or not?
by spook100
Tue Jul 05, 2011 9:13 am
Forum: Grain Brewing
Topic: Beer Disaster(I'm an idiot)
Replies: 20
Views: 1368

Re: Beer Disaster(I'm an idiot)

I woke up on Sunday morning to find a huge puddle of beer around my fridge. I had poured myself a pint from my corny the night before and left both the gas and beer line with party tap connect. When I had closed the fridge door the party tap had become wedged between the door and the keg, depressing...
by spook100
Mon Jul 04, 2011 3:26 pm
Forum: Grain Brewing
Topic: cold conditioning for clarity
Replies: 22
Views: 1387

Re: cold conditioning for clarity

Dont get me going on carbonation of Ales :D ... damn, I can resist :D ... this is how I do it: Once I've crash cooled and added finings (yes, even to british bitters :oops: ), I let it settle out for about 3 days and then rack off to the corny, force carbonate and leave for about 5 days for the CO2...
by spook100
Thu Jun 30, 2011 4:15 pm
Forum: Grain Brewing
Topic: cold conditioning for clarity
Replies: 22
Views: 1387

Re: cold conditioning for clarity

Personally, I think that cold conditioning improves the end product. It drops out some of the remaining yeast and protein, generally reducing the green character of the beer. Also, keeping beer at a warmer temperature exponentially increases the rate at which oxidation reactions occur, so if you're ...
by spook100
Tue Jun 28, 2011 9:38 am
Forum: Brewing Equipment
Topic: Blichmann Beer Gun v. Counter-Pressure Filler
Replies: 0
Views: 222

Blichmann Beer Gun v. Counter-Pressure Filler

Hi I am looking to get either a Blichmann beer gun or a counter-pressure bottle filler for bottling from my cornies. I like the look of the beer gun because it seems easier to handle, however, from what I can see, it doesn't seem to use any counter-pressure to keep the CO2 in solution. When using th...
by spook100
Sat Jun 25, 2011 7:28 pm
Forum: Grain Brewing
Topic: cold conditioning for clarity
Replies: 22
Views: 1387

Re: cold conditioning for clarity

I prefer to bottle direct from the cooler. It seems to me that if you let it warm up first, it gives any chill haze that has settled out a chance to re-dissolved and be transferred into the bottle.
by spook100
Wed Jun 22, 2011 8:48 am
Forum: Grain Brewing
Topic: Sour Mashing
Replies: 7
Views: 569

Sour Mashing

Hi I am going to try and brew an experimental beer (see http://www.jimsbeerkit.co.uk/forum/viewtopic.php?f=16&t=42492 ) that is slightly soured, and am planning to sour it by making a sour mash. My aim is not to create a very sour beer, I just want a slight sour twange. I have never tried sour mashi...
by spook100
Tue Jun 21, 2011 7:42 am
Forum: Grain Brewing
Topic: cold conditioning for clarity
Replies: 22
Views: 1387

Re: cold conditioning for clarity

I chill mine right down to -1c and leave it for a couple of days. Then I add gelatine to drag any chill haze out of suspension and leave it a few more days before bottling. Works brilliantly.
by spook100
Mon Jun 20, 2011 5:52 pm
Forum: Grain Brewing
Topic: Benefits or downsides of cooler fermentation for ales
Replies: 12
Views: 622

Re: Benefits or downsides of cooler fermentation for ales

Diacetyl is a by-product of fermentation that is generally considered a flaw. Diacetyl is produced early in the fermentation process and then most of it is reabsorbed by the yeast and reduced to flavourless compounds later on. Keeping the fermentation temperatures on the low side early, and then inc...