Wyeast results (1318, London III)

Share your experiences of using brewing yeast.
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Jim
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Wyeast results (1318, London III)

Post by Jim » Tue Sep 20, 2005 4:28 pm

I thought I'd start a new thread to relate my Wyeast experiences so far!

I've made 2 batches now, the first is being consumed and I just barrelled the second batch today. I learnt a lot on the first batch, which is a bit below par; the second batch seems much better.

I've published the recipe in other threads (I used identical grain bills and very similar hop schedules for both brews), so I'll just put the fermentation results here: -

Batch 1: Wye Bitter

Fermented at around 22C for first 4 days with problems straight away; it took ages to get going. Added more starter at 2 days and roused.

I left it alone for the next 10 days, then skimmed it and put it in the barrel (probably too early). However, I didn't take any gravity readings because I'm a plonker, and I thought it would ferment just the same as Gervin Ale! :bonk

The batch displayed a slight off-smell (bruised apples) and a yeasty taste which has diminished after 3 weeks in the barrel, so that the beer is quite good (but not the best ever). It may still improve (if it gets the chance before it all goes!)

:wall


Batch 2: Wye Aye Bitter ;)

I used a bigger starter here (about a litre) and it got away within 24hrs no problem at around 22C.

This time I skimmed and roused every other day and took some gravity readings to monitor progress:

Day 1: OG = 44
Day 9: Grav = 18
Day 13: Grav = 15
Day 17: Grav = 14 (Racked into barrel)

This batch has no off flavours or smells at all, just malt and hops! I'm looking forward to it being ready to drink. :P

Once I get the hang of using this yeast I'll do an article for the website; at the moment I'm still a learner, though! :blink:

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Post by Jim » Sat Oct 01, 2005 8:14 am

My third batch (pale ale) has now been in the fermenter nearly a week, and is down to 1018 already (from OG 45).

I've skimmed and roused this one every day, and fermentation temperature has been held close to 22C throughout.

Batch 2 is maturing now and sly samples show no off smells or flavours, and quite a bit of residual sweetness, though that's wearing off as it matures out.

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Post by Jim » Sat Oct 01, 2005 4:29 pm

QUOTE (Daft as a Brush @ Oct 1 2005, 09:42 AM) I'll look forward to your article, are you planning on repitching the yeast to try and keep the cost down?

I live fairly close the Ringwood and the Hop Back brewery and keep planning to pop in with a thermos to see if they will donate a lump of yeast to me. I may have to buy a quantity of Fortyniner or Summer Lightning in exchange but it will be worth the sacrifice. :P
I don't intend to repitch as such. I split the original starter into 6 and kept them in the fridge till required (I've used 3 already, no problems with any of them).

That way, the yeast is all the same generation and infections can't get passed from brew to brew. The problem is they may not last long enough for all six to get used.

I want to try other strains when the currents starters are all gone. I've seen some good reports of http://www.wyeastlab.com/beprlist.htm#ale (scroll down a bit) which is "London ESB Ale Yeast".


I wish I had the nerve to turn up at a brewery and ask for a bucketfull of yeast, though! :D

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Post by Jim » Sat Oct 01, 2005 8:19 pm

Hi, DB. Yeah, what you do is make a starter up of about 1/2 gall, let it ferment almost out, then split it into smaller bottles. I did a bit of pictorial guide http://homepage.ntlworld.com/jim.dunleavy/wyeast.htm, though it's a bit sketchy. There's a good thread on http://www.aussiehomebrewer.com/forum/S ... t1434.html about it.

Re two boilers, I've often felt the urge to invest in another to use as a hot liquor tun, but have never got round to it. I had some visions of mounting it in a wooden frame or something and adding plumbing to make it easier to brew (less lifting of heavy containers). Oh well! :rolleyes:

The yeast washing on that site is just to remove the trub from the yeast. Proper yeast washing in dilute acid is used to remove bacteria that have accumulated in the yeast when it is repitched over and over. Without that, it would become unusable after several generations.

Splitting the starter overcomes that problem, because all the bottles contain second generation yeast.

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