Saccharomyces

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LeeH
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Saccharomyces

Post by LeeH » Fri Sep 07, 2018 10:00 am

What flavours does Saccharomyces add when pitched with with a neutral yeast?

Sour? Tart?

And what styles is it used for?


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Jim
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Re: Saccharomyces

Post by Jim » Fri Sep 07, 2018 10:04 am

Saccharomyces is just the genus of all yeasts. Saccharomyces Cerevisiae is brewers yeast.
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LeeH
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Re: Saccharomyces

Post by LeeH » Fri Sep 07, 2018 2:24 pm

Thanks Jim, understood.

Reading the blurb on this yeast I miss understood thinking it was some kind of funky/sour/tart yeast.


Funktown Pale Ale is a blend of our Vermont Ale strain and a unique wild strain of Saccharomyces that is well suited for primary fermentation. The combination of the citrus/peach esters from the Vermont Ale strain and the very light funk and pineapple/mango esters from the wild Saccharomyces produces a unique flavor and aroma profile that is fruit-forward. Expect this blend to finish drier than the Vermont Ale.
We recommend following a similar fermentation scheme as is used for the Vermont Ale, fermenting at 67-69 ºF for 3-4 days, and then raising the temperature to 72 ºF until a stable gravity is reached.




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PeeBee
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Re: Saccharomyces

Post by PeeBee » Fri Sep 07, 2018 5:00 pm

Saccharomyces Cerevisiae is indeed bog standard "brewers" yeast. But it comes in a number of variations, and some that aren't "Cerevisiae" at all. These "funk" products home in on these more unusual varieties of yeast, and even mess with "yeasts" that belong to different "families" (genus) like "Brettanomyces". Not many of these variations make pleasant beer, and "wild yeast" is often connected with "my beer's gone bad".

Lager yeast was considered a different species ("bottom fermenting") and got the name Saccharomyces carlsbergensis. This was later poo-pooed and it became a variation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. More recently lager yeast has been carved of into its own species again but seemingly renamed Saccharomyces pastorianus (some will describe S. pastorianus as an entirely different species to S. carlsbergensis).

You think you've messed up with all this yeast naming? You'll have good company!

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