Durden Park

A pre-moderated forum for linking to affiliated brewing organisations and sites of special interest.
User avatar
Andy
Virtually comatose but still standing
Posts: 8715
Joined: Fri Nov 18, 2005 1:00 pm
Location: Ash, Surrey
Contact:

Durden Park

Post by Andy » Tue Nov 21, 2006 11:09 pm

Now have a www site with recipes etc.

http://www.durdenparkbeer.org.uk/index.html

They seem to have made the same mistake on all the recipes in that the ingredients are lists per gallon of required volume but they show 23L in brackets. So ignore the 23L and just multiply the quantities by 5 for a 5 gallon brew length.

Interesting that they advocate a stiff mash and three hour mash period in their "Brewing Old British Beers" section!
Dan!

steve_flack

Post by steve_flack » Wed Nov 22, 2006 9:37 am

I would wholeheartedly recommend the Whitbread London Porter recipe. It's excellent - takes a while to smooth out but when it does....wow. It is the best of the recipes I've made from that book (and I've made quite a few)

PieOPah

Post by PieOPah » Wed Nov 22, 2006 10:15 am

The amount of hops seems a hell of a lot. Gives bitterness in excess of 90.....

May well try the porter in the very near future :)

I've added the recipe to my collection, scaled up and slightly adjusted the hops (halved the amount) and changed the grain bill to suit my efficiency.

steve_flack

Post by steve_flack » Wed Nov 22, 2006 2:25 pm

PieOPah wrote:The amount of hops seems a hell of a lot. Gives bitterness in excess of 90.....
That's nothing. You should see some of the other recipes in the book! :wink:
slightly adjusted the hops
Don't - the beer is fine as it is. Remember this is not a modern running beer. It's meant to be kept for several months before drinking. The flavour of the hops mellows and blends with the rest of the beer.

Besides how is halving them 'slightly adjusted'? Would you like someone to half your salary and go 'oh...it's only a slight adjustment'.

PieOPah

Post by PieOPah » Wed Nov 22, 2006 3:01 pm

If you can vouch for the amount of hops then I'll stick to the original :)

Just seems like a scary amount :D

If it needs to be kept for several months before drinking then I think I had best get my bottles cleaned up :)

User avatar
Andy
Virtually comatose but still standing
Posts: 8715
Joined: Fri Nov 18, 2005 1:00 pm
Location: Ash, Surrey
Contact:

Post by Andy » Wed Nov 22, 2006 3:08 pm

I doubt that the Durden Park crew have palettes like old leather and so only release recipes which are drinkable. I think it's a case of keeping the faith and following the recipe to the letter.
Dan!

PieOPah

Post by PieOPah » Wed Nov 22, 2006 3:13 pm

Okay, adjusted for efficiency and volume (the London Porter seems to have a low efficiency based on the OG)

Says you can use Goldings or Fuggles so I have done half of each. My final recipe looks like this -

Whitbread 's London Porter (1850)
12-B Robust Porter

Image

Size: 35.0 imp pt
Efficiency: 65%
Attenuation: 75.0%
Calories: 321.17 per 1 imp pt

Original Gravity: 1.060 (1.048 - 1.065)
|===================#============|
Terminal Gravity: 1.015 (1.012 - 1.016)
|====================#===========|
Color: 29.0 (22.0 - 35.0)
|================#===============|
Alcohol: 5.93% (4.8% - 6.0%)
|=======================#========|
Bitterness: 73.53 (25.0 - 50.0)
|================================|

Ingredients:
5.0 kg Maris Otter
1.0 kg English Brown Malt
0.35 kg British Black Patent
60.0 g Goldings (5.0%) - added during boil, boiled 90 min
60.0 g Fuggle (4.8%) - added during boil, boiled 90 min

Schedule:

Notes:
Mash grain for 3 hours at 150º F (66±1º C). Raise temperature to 170º F (77º C) for 30 minutes.

Sparge with hot water at 180 - 185º F (82 - 85º C) to O.G. or required volume.

Boil with hops for 90 minutes.

Cool and ferment with a good quality ale yeast.


Results generated by BeerTools Pro 1.0.8

steve_flack

Post by steve_flack » Wed Nov 22, 2006 3:57 pm

I think I might have used just Fuggles when I did it.

You're right about the recipes assuming a low efficiency. I basically kept the hops the same but scaled the recipe to suit the sort of efficiencies I get on my kit.

User avatar
Andy
Virtually comatose but still standing
Posts: 8715
Joined: Fri Nov 18, 2005 1:00 pm
Location: Ash, Surrey
Contact:

Post by Andy » Thu Nov 23, 2006 9:28 am

The Durden Park process recommends mashing with a very stiff mash ( just less than 2L/kg) perhaps this is why the efficiencies are so low ?
Dan!

Seveneer

Post by Seveneer » Thu Nov 23, 2006 11:56 pm

That's interesting Andy. As you know I go for wet mashes to increase efficiency. Maybe this is at the expense of flavour :?:

/Phil.

steve_flack

Post by steve_flack » Fri Nov 24, 2006 9:28 am

I generally go for 2L/kg and I used to get 75% on my old set-up. When I finally get the new one up and running I was planning on moving to thinner mashes for various reasons.

Vossy1

Post by Vossy1 » Fri Nov 24, 2006 10:26 pm

When I finally get the new one up and running I was planning on moving to thinner mashes for various reasons.
Ditto 8)

BitterTed

Post by BitterTed » Sun Dec 03, 2006 12:09 am

steve_flack wrote:I would wholeheartedly recommend the Whitbread London Porter recipe. It's excellent - takes a while to smooth out but when it does....wow. It is the best of the recipes I've made from that book (and I've made quite a few)
Oh my, I couldn't agree more! When I first got a copy of Old British Beers, this was one of the first recipes I made and it is an incredible beer. Now, I brew that beer at least once a year.
Oh, I agree, don't adjust the quantities because they seem high, the beers come out great just as they are listed!!

steve_flack

Post by steve_flack » Sun Dec 03, 2006 10:11 am

PieOPah wrote: If it needs to be kept for several months before drinking then I think I had best get my bottles cleaned up :)
Or go mad and buy another corny :roll:

User avatar
Andy
Virtually comatose but still standing
Posts: 8715
Joined: Fri Nov 18, 2005 1:00 pm
Location: Ash, Surrey
Contact:

Post by Andy » Sun Dec 03, 2006 9:20 pm

Right, the Whitbread London Porter is on my list for the first brew of 2007!

Sounds great.
Dan!

Post Reply