Making bread with left over yeast

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Chug

Re: Making bread with left over yeast

Post by Chug » Sat Apr 02, 2016 11:05 pm

Mine tasted bloody lovely, no beer flavour and it seemed to enhance the flavour of the bread even though I shook up the yeast bottle with beer on top before use, the only downside was it was a little under cooked in the very centre and that was because I wanted bread for work sandwiches and couldn't leave it in the oven any longer! Definitely gonna be doing this again :D :D

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Re: Making bread with left over yeast

Post by Clibit » Sat Apr 02, 2016 11:21 pm

floydmeddler wrote:Stir a tsp into 150g flour and 150g water. It will ferment up like a sourdough starter in a day or so. Use that. No beer flavours.

I've done it with s05 slurry. Bread had look and texture of sourdough but no sourness. I prefer sourness. However, if you keep feeding it, it will be come sour after a week or so.

I've been 'milling' barley in my spice grinder and using the barley flour in breads. So nice. Lots of variety too. Planning on adding 30g of dark crystal flour to my next loaf.
I made up the dough for a loaf today with just some trub added, and 25% ground spent grains, it's rising nicely in the fridge but there's a risk of bitterness. I also made up a starter with flour, water, a little trub and half a tsp sugar. Would like the sourdough flavour.

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Re: Making bread with left over yeast

Post by bellebouche » Sun Apr 03, 2016 7:55 am

Here's a loaf... with US05 and CaraMunich 160

Image

Whenever I do a brewday I crush up a little malt and keep it in a jar in the kitchen for breadmaking. Just a small handful adds a nutty dimension to the bread and in this case I partnered it with a little chopped rosemary.

Tony1951

Re: Making bread with left over yeast

Post by Tony1951 » Sun Apr 03, 2016 9:29 am

bellebouche wrote:Here's a loaf... with US05 and CaraMunich 160

Image

Whenever I do a brewday I crush up a little malt and keep it in a jar in the kitchen for breadmaking. Just a small handful adds a nutty dimension to the bread and in this case I partnered it with a little chopped rosemary.
That looks gorgeous bellebouche. Very appetising.

I grind my own wheat (well its not my wheat, I got it from Chug) and to get that nutty texture, I back off the stones a bit at the end of the grind so the last 5% is course ground. It really adds a nice crunchy nutty texture to the finished loaf.

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Re: Making bread with left over yeast

Post by Clibit » Sun Apr 03, 2016 11:32 am

I hope mine comes out looking as good as that one!

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Re: Making bread with left over yeast

Post by bellebouche » Sun Apr 03, 2016 1:51 pm

Tony1951 wrote: I grind my own wheat (well its not my wheat, I got it from Chug) and to get that nutty texture, I back off the stones a bit at the end of the grind so the last 5% is course ground. It really adds a nice crunchy nutty texture to the finished loaf.
Now, that's interesting. My fave flour to bake with is a French "T80" wheatflour - hard to explain as it's neither wholemeal nor white... somewhere inbetween... I get it from a local store that carriers flours from an independent miller... if I time it right I can have flour that's just a week or two old... it makes a tremendous difference to the loaf. I often wonder at the degradation in the flours you see on supermarket shelves

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Re: Making bread with left over yeast

Post by Clibit » Sun Apr 03, 2016 2:12 pm

bellebouche wrote:
Tony1951 wrote: I grind my own wheat (well its not my wheat, I got it from Chug) and to get that nutty texture, I back off the stones a bit at the end of the grind so the last 5% is course ground. It really adds a nice crunchy nutty texture to the finished loaf.
Now, that's interesting. My fave flour to bake with is a French "T80" wheatflour - hard to explain as it's neither wholemeal nor white... somewhere inbetween... I get it from a local store that carriers flours from an independent miller... if I time it right I can have flour that's just a week or two old... it makes a tremendous difference to the loaf. I often wonder at the degradation in the flours you see on supermarket shelves
Useful info folks thanks. I know french flour makes far superior bread. My trub bread has come out pretty well. Pleased. Just chucked a bit of trub in! Next one will be with the starter.

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Re: Making bread with left over yeast

Post by Notlaw » Sun Apr 03, 2016 2:15 pm

How much yeast trub are we talking? A tablespoon? An egg cup? A mug?

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Re: Making bread with left over yeast

Post by Clibit » Sun Apr 03, 2016 2:58 pm

Do what Floydmeddler said above. A teaspoon in a cup of flour and a cup of water, leave it a day or so.

Tony1951

Re: Making bread with left over yeast

Post by Tony1951 » Sun Apr 03, 2016 4:15 pm

bellebouche wrote: Now, that's interesting. My fave flour to bake with is a French "T80" wheatflour - hard to explain as it's neither wholemeal nor white... somewhere inbetween... I get it from a local store that carriers flours from an independent miller... if I time it right I can have flour that's just a week or two old... it makes a tremendous difference to the loaf. I often wonder at the degradation in the flours you see on supermarket shelves

Old flour does rise much less. I've seen that a lot.

My understanding is that real wholemeal flour containing the whole of the wheat germ doesn't keep long and goes rancid in about a month. I think it is something to do with the oils in the wheat germ. I think the modern roller mill produced 'wholemeal' flour has some parts of the germ screened out so it has a decent shelf life. This is something I only have a passing grasp of - Chug on here will know the full story and the real story since he manages a community water mill.

My home ground flour is ground just before I make the bread. I weigh out the correct weight of wheat from the flour requirement of the recipe, grind it and make the dough. I find that wholemeal doesn't rise as much (nothing like) what we call white flour which as far as I understand is purely the starch component of the wheat. It rises like mad, makes nice soft bread, but it leaves out the core component of the wheat, I think. I don't get that hypo-glycemic 'crash' you get after eating white bread where after an hour or so you are starving again. I can eat a couple of slices of wholemeal and I'm fine for hours after.

Image

This is a pretty dense, course, 375 gramme loaf just cooling right now on the kitchen bench. 1200 kilo-calories. Cost about twenty-seven pence, not counting electricity.

Harrowbrewer

Re: Making bread with left over yeast

Post by Harrowbrewer » Sun Apr 03, 2016 8:03 pm

Slightly unrelated, but I've just found half a dozen sachets of Coopers Kits yeast in the fridge. I use Coopers cans for partial mashes quite a lot, but always use a different yeast. I'll try one of my standard bread recipes with it and see if I can taste any difference.

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Re: Making bread with left over yeast

Post by bellebouche » Sun Apr 03, 2016 11:29 pm

Harrowbrewer wrote:Slightly unrelated, but I've just found half a dozen sachets of Coopers Kits yeast in the fridge. I use Coopers cans for partial mashes quite a lot, but always use a different yeast. I'll try one of my standard bread recipes with it and see if I can taste any difference.
If you want to try that I'd mix like for like flour and water (200g water, 200g flour) and incorporate that yeast into that mix and leave it for 24 hrs... just as it goes past peak fermentation it's ready to use as your starter.

Chug

Re: Making bread with left over yeast

Post by Chug » Wed Apr 06, 2016 8:50 am

Tony1951 wrote:

Old flour does rise much less. I've seen that a lot.

My understanding is that real wholemeal flour containing the whole of the wheat germ doesn't keep long and goes rancid in about a month. I think it is something to do with the oils in the wheat germ. I think the modern roller mill produced 'wholemeal' flour has some parts of the germ screened out so it has a decent shelf life. This is something I only have a passing grasp of - Chug on here will know the full story and the real story since he manages a community water mill.

No reason why wholemeal flour should go rancid if it is stored in cool, dry, dark place.
By law we have to put a 6 month from date of production use by date but we have used our stoneground wholemeal flour up to 18 months after milling,

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Re: Making bread with left over yeast

Post by Clibit » Wed Apr 06, 2016 9:04 am

I baked my first loaf using my trub yeast starter last night, not tried the bread yet but it looks great. Used a cup of starter. Mixed and proved it in the breadmaker, knocked it back and let it rise all day (about 16 hours) in the fridge.
Last edited by Clibit on Wed Apr 06, 2016 2:28 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Tony1951

Re: Making bread with left over yeast

Post by Tony1951 » Wed Apr 06, 2016 10:32 am

Clibit wrote:I baked my first loaf using my trub yeast starter last night, not tried the bread yet but it looks great. Used a cup of starter. Mixed and proved it in the breadmaker, knocked it back and let it rise all day (about 16 hours) in the fridge.
Enjoy it. Nothing wasted - eh? Would you say it rose more slowly than a teaspoon and a half of dried yeast? I suppose that rises at room temperature in about an hour or so after being knocked back. You had yours in the fridge of course so it would be slower.

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