Lupulin Powder

Get advice on making beer from raw ingredients (malt, hops, water and yeast)
Matt in Birdham
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Lupulin Powder

Post by Matt in Birdham » Wed Apr 05, 2017 10:44 pm

This stuff looks rather amazing.. http://scottjanish.com/lupulin-powder-v ... xperiment/
I have a lot of time for Scott Janish and his blog, so if he says this stuff is the dogs danglies then I am willing to believe it. Available to home brewers (in the US at least) from the summer, apparently..

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MarkA
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Re: Lupulin Powder

Post by MarkA » Thu Apr 06, 2017 1:33 pm

An interesting read, thanks Matt. I'll definitely be seeking some of this out when (or if) it becomes available over here.

I've also bookmarked the site and will be having a read through some more of Scott's blogs, there's some good stuff on there, cheers!

simon12
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Re: Lupulin Powder

Post by simon12 » Fri Apr 07, 2017 6:15 pm

Interesting I wonder how it compares to hop extracts/oils

McMullan
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Re: Lupulin Powder

Post by McMullan » Fri Apr 07, 2017 7:44 pm

I'm struggling with this one. It's not clear whether the lupulin glands remain intact or not. Interesting though.

Fil
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Re: Lupulin Powder

Post by Fil » Fri Apr 07, 2017 9:51 pm

No hop debris to filter out,Less storage space, just a tad more trub, I WANT all my hops in this format..
Now how can i extract the lupulin from my own bines ? ;)
ist update for months n months..
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IPA
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Re: Lupulin Powder

Post by IPA » Sat Apr 08, 2017 7:35 am

LupuLN2will create intense hop (sic) flavor and aroma
Here we go again just bung in some plain flour and you have the holy grail of new wave "beer" the perfect hop soup. =D>
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orlando
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Re: Lupulin Powder

Post by orlando » Sat Apr 08, 2017 9:05 am

IPA wrote:
LupuLN2will create intense hop (sic) flavor and aroma
Here we go again just bung in some plain flour and you have the holy grail of new wave "beer" the perfect hop soup. =D>
I would read the article before passing judgement. It might actually be the solution to the hop soup problem.
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IPA
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Re: Lupulin Powder

Post by IPA » Sun Apr 09, 2017 8:10 am

orlando wrote:
IPA wrote:
LupuLN2will create intense hop (sic) flavor and aroma
Here we go again just bung in some plain flour and you have the holy grail of new wave "beer" the perfect hop soup. =D>
I would read the article before passing judgement. It might actually be the solution to the hop soup problem.
I highlighted that part to emphasise the fact that the present craze seems to be "who can make the hoppiest beer" There are many more flavours and aromas in a well brewed beer other than those derived from hops. It's fairly easy to brew a bad beer and then hide all of its shortcomings behind a smoke screen of hops. When I want an honest opinion of a particular beer I take it to Jean-Marc the owner of our local iron mongers shop. He has taste buds and a nose that can detect flavours and aromas that are way beyond me. I am sure that if I gave him one of these "hop forward" beers to taste he would be physically sick. This has just given me the idea to try him out and post the result.
"You're not drunk if you can lie on the floor without holding on." Dean Martin

1. Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well-preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, thoroughly used, totally worn out and loudly proclaiming... "f*ck, what a trip!"

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Sadfield
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Re: Lupulin Powder

Post by Sadfield » Sun Apr 09, 2017 10:26 am

IPA wrote:I highlighted that part to emphasise the fact that the present craze seems to be "who can make the hoppiest beer" There are many more flavours and aromas in a well brewed beer other than those derived from hops.
Wow, how narrow minded is this? It is possible to brew and appreciate all styles of beer. Are you seriously implying that these beers cannot also be well brewed?
IPA wrote: It's fairly easy to brew a bad beer and then hide all of its shortcomings behind a smoke screen of hops.
It is equally possible to brew bad beer and hide all of its shortcomings by marketing it as 'Real'. Given that the NEIPA style is centred around low bitterness, high aroma hopping and soft, mouthfeel, it is obvious to most good brewers that a different approach to water treatment, grist and mashing is required. So just throwing hops at any poorly brewed beer will not replicate the style. I'm pretty sure that 30-40 years ago people were leveling the same accusations at Indian food and its heavy use of aromatic spices, yet we now have Michelin starred Indian Restaurants.
IPA wrote: When I want an honest opinion of a particular beer I take it to Jean-Marc the owner of our local iron mongers shop. He has taste buds and a nose that can detect flavours and aromas that are way beyond me. I am sure that if I gave him one of these "hop forward" beers to taste he would be physically sick. This has just given me the idea to try him out and post the result.
Your self acknowledged poor palate and nasal receptors maybe the reason you do not appreciate these beers. Although I suspect you haven't tried one.

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Re: Lupulin Powder

Post by McMullan » Sun Apr 09, 2017 1:18 pm

Our taste for spicy foods developed centuries ago. The first Indian restaurant in the UK opened over 200 years ago. Indian cuisine, like brewing, goes back thousands of years and it has developed into something generally considered as one of the world’s finest cuisines. NEIPA is a recent ‘discovery’ that clearly deviates from what is generally accepted as being a key characteristic of the IPA style. Apparently they taste great. They don’t look great, though. Turbid beers are generally considered unacceptable, however they're polished for presentation and marketed. It’s far from being ’narrow minded’.

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IPA
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Re: Lupulin Powder

Post by IPA » Sun Apr 09, 2017 1:54 pm

Sadfield wrote:
IPA wrote:I highlighted that part to emphasise the fact that the present craze seems to be "who can make the hoppiest beer" There are many more flavours and aromas in a well brewed beer other than those derived from hops.
Wow, how narrow minded is this? It is possible to brew and appreciate all styles of beer. Are you seriously implying that these beers cannot also be well brewed?
IPA wrote: It's fairly easy to brew a bad beer and then hide all of its shortcomings behind a smoke screen of hops.
It is equally possible to brew bad beer and hide all of its shortcomings by marketing it as 'Real'. Given that the NEIPA style is centred around low bitterness, high aroma hopping and soft, mouthfeel, it is obvious to most good brewers that a different approach to water treatment, grist and mashing is required. So just throwing hops at any poorly brewed beer will not replicate the style. I'm pretty sure that 30-40 years ago people were leveling the same accusations at Indian food and its heavy use of aromatic spices, yet we now have Michelin starred Indian Restaurants.
IPA wrote: When I want an honest opinion of a particular beer I take it to Jean-Marc the owner of our local iron mongers shop. He has taste buds and a nose that can detect flavours and aromas that are way beyond me. I am sure that if I gave him one of these "hop forward" beers to taste he would be physically sick. This has just given me the idea to try him out and post the result.
Your self acknowledged poor palate and nasal receptors maybe the reason you do not appreciate these beers. Although I suspect you haven't tried one.
Pale Ale for the Indias (the original description) they certainly are not. Find an original name for them but in the meantime I will continue with the name "Cloudy Hop Soup" =D>
"You're not drunk if you can lie on the floor without holding on." Dean Martin

1. Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well-preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, thoroughly used, totally worn out and loudly proclaiming... "f*ck, what a trip!"

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Sadfield
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Re: Lupulin Powder

Post by Sadfield » Sun Apr 09, 2017 2:59 pm

McMullan wrote:Our taste for spicy foods developed centuries ago. The first Indian restaurant in the UK opened over 200 years ago. Indian cuisine, like brewing, goes back thousands of years and it has developed into something generally considered as one of the world’s finest cuisines. NEIPA is a recent ‘discovery’ that clearly deviates from what is generally accepted as being a key characteristic of the IPA style. Apparently they taste great. They don’t look great, though. Turbid beers are generally considered unacceptable, however they're polished for presentation and marketed. It’s far from being ’narrow minded’.
IPA wrote:Pale Ale for the Indias (the original description) they certainly are not. Find an original name for them but in the meantime I will continue with the name "Cloudy Hop Soup" =D>
And IPAs have developed over centuries also, and NEIPA is part of that. Narrow minded to not accept that styles change, but ignore the fact that Mild, Bitter Stout and Porter are not the same as they were 100 years ago. Yes it is narrow minded to view them in a derogatory manner, to say they are not brewed properly and use terms like "Cloudy Hop Soup". Narrow minded to judge them on a fallacy that a turbid appearance is detrimental to taste. I find it laughable that NEIPAs are viewed as a substandard product, despite the cloudy appearance being created by high levels of a core beer ingredient, hops. Yet adding fish and animal derived products to other styles is viewed as good brewing practice. =D>

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Re: Lupulin Powder

Post by McMullan » Sun Apr 09, 2017 4:00 pm

The vast majority of consumers expect beer to be served bright. It would be narrow minded and even arrogant to ignore that cultural expectation. There is no reason why a well-brewed, heavily hopped IPA shouldn't go bright, without forced filtration or even without additives to speed up the process functioning Brewer's yeast do naturally.

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Sadfield
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Re: Lupulin Powder

Post by Sadfield » Sun Apr 09, 2017 4:44 pm

McMullan wrote:The vast majority of consumers expect beer to be served bright. It would be narrow minded and even arrogant to ignore that cultural expectation. There is no reason why a well-brewed, heavily hopped IPA shouldn't go bright, without forced filtration or even without additives to speed up the process functioning Brewer's yeast do naturally.
So a NEIPA hopped with Lupolin Powder will meet with one's approval.

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Re: Lupulin Powder

Post by DaveGillespie » Mon Apr 10, 2017 9:40 am

Turbid beers are generally considered unacceptable, however they're polished for presentation and marketed
Hefeweizen, anyone?

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