Looking for your Brown Ale recipe suggestions

Get advice on making beer from raw ingredients (malt, hops, water and yeast)
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Silver_Is_Money
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Looking for your Brown Ale recipe suggestions

Post by Silver_Is_Money » Mon Mar 25, 2019 2:20 pm

I've never brewed a Brown Ale, and the thought of doing so intrigues me. Please offer up some all grain recipe suggestions.

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Trefoyl
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Re: Looking for your Brown Ale recipe suggestions

Post by Trefoyl » Mon Mar 25, 2019 2:35 pm

2 different recipes for Sam Smith’s Nutbrown but seem similar and call for crystal and chocolate
http://austinhomebrew.com/assets/images ... /04234.pdf

http://www.britishbrewer.com/2010/04/re ... brown-ale/

I haven’t tried to make it and would wonder what yeast to use, and then handling that yeast has an impact, but I can’t duplicacte what they do.
Wyeast West Yorkshire is not the same but may be sort of similar.
I want to try and harvest the yeast from Yorkshire Stingo but won’t have time until around May.
Sommeliers recommend that you swirl a glass of wine and inhale its bouquet before throwing it in the face of your enemy.

Silver_Is_Money
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Re: Looking for your Brown Ale recipe suggestions

Post by Silver_Is_Money » Mon Mar 25, 2019 4:38 pm

Excellent! It seems simple enough. Thanks for the links!!!

Dave S
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Re: Looking for your Brown Ale recipe suggestions

Post by Dave S » Mon Mar 25, 2019 6:43 pm

Here's one for SS Nut Brown that I have in BeerSmith. Can't remember where it came from now.
SS_Nut_Brown.png
I'm sure any Yorkshire style yeast will do a good job.
Best wishes

Dave

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Eric
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Re: Looking for your Brown Ale recipe suggestions

Post by Eric » Mon Mar 25, 2019 9:46 pm

There's a little it of reading to be found here.

And this is an actual brew log of the same period of a brewery that was local to me. It takes a bit of decyphering. Might do that later.
R0010228.JPG
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Trefoyl
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Re: Looking for your Brown Ale recipe suggestions

Post by Trefoyl » Mon Mar 25, 2019 10:17 pm

C357142B-0F5F-4596-AF39-AF859C0C1A20.jpeg
Graham Wheeler Sam Smith’s Nut Brown in his Brew Classic European Beers at Home, which looks similar to the one Dave posted.
Sommeliers recommend that you swirl a glass of wine and inhale its bouquet before throwing it in the face of your enemy.

Silver_Is_Money
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Re: Looking for your Brown Ale recipe suggestions

Post by Silver_Is_Money » Tue Mar 26, 2019 12:12 am

Excellent stuff here. Many thanks!!! I grabbed the Samuel Smith's recipe. Having trouble interpreting the one above it.

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Eric
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Re: Looking for your Brown Ale recipe suggestions

Post by Eric » Tue Mar 26, 2019 1:31 am

Silver_Is_Money wrote:
Tue Mar 26, 2019 12:12 am
Having trouble interpreting the one above it.
Not surprising. That brewery malted barleys on site. Both here were grown in Yorkshire. Guessing it would seem that 7 qtrs were what we today call pale malt taken from bin "N", while 2 quarters were possibly kilned more heavily to what was likely brown malt, which might or might not be like that we today call Brown Malt.

CWA would appear to be some sort of sugary addition that was in common use then, while invert is almost certainly that available to this day, made by Ragus and now distributed by Bako.

The hops were from Kent and grown or supplied by Jenner. Make of that what you wish, I haven't a clue what they might have been.

So far so good? Brewing excellence is somewhat of a minefield, while some might think it's just an extension of chemistry. C'est la vie.
Without patience, life becomes difficult and the sooner it's finished, the better.

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Re: Looking for your Brown Ale recipe suggestions

Post by Dave S » Tue Mar 26, 2019 9:58 am

Trefoyl wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 10:17 pm
C357142B-0F5F-4596-AF39-AF859C0C1A20.jpeg

Graham Wheeler Sam Smith’s Nut Brown in his Brew Classic European Beers at Home, which looks similar to the one Dave posted.
I think you are right, Craig now I think about it. I will have upscaled it for my 27L brew length which will explain the slight increase in my quantities compared with with Graham's 25L version.
Best wishes

Dave

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Trefoyl
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Re: Looking for your Brown Ale recipe suggestions

Post by Trefoyl » Tue Mar 26, 2019 11:22 am

I didn’t know Graham had a recipe and I’ve never used amber malt that I can remember. Crisp and Simpson’s have slightly different versions. It’s not even carried by MoreBeer.
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Re: Looking for your Brown Ale recipe suggestions

Post by Dave S » Tue Mar 26, 2019 12:57 pm

Trefoyl wrote:
Tue Mar 26, 2019 11:22 am
I didn’t know Graham had a recipe and I’ve never used amber malt that I can remember. Crisp and Simpson’s have slightly different versions. It’s not even carried by MoreBeer.
The only Amber I've used and only once was the the Crisp at 50 EBC. It's apparently a different animal from the Fawcett's which is around 100 EBC. Don't know about Simpson's. It lends a slight biscuity quality to a bitter.
Best wishes

Dave

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