hot batch sparge = mash out?

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patwestlake
Steady Drinker
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Location: Penarth, South Wales

hot batch sparge = mash out?

Post by patwestlake » Thu May 04, 2017 8:11 pm

greetings pop pickers!

If if batch sparge my BIAB at a higher temperature (70-72?) does this equate to a mash out? I know it won't affect the first runnings, but as they are now heating in the kettle, the temp will get up quickly hence preserving the sugar profile. I seem to recall that there is an upper limit for sparge temperature to leave the tannins in the grains, but what I'm after is guidance/experience of sparge temperature for profiling.

Pat
FV : Weiss Weiss Baby! Weissbier
Conditioning (bottles) : Citra SmaSh, Kolsch, Dirty Harry (Ghost Ship), Galaxy Delight

Next : Patersbier, some sort of Goes, Cindy Juice

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donchiquon
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Location: Chamonix-Mont-Blanc, France

Re: hot batch sparge = mash out?

Post by donchiquon » Sat Jun 10, 2017 4:15 pm

Hi Pat

If you are heating your first runnings quickly to stop enzyme activity and then batch sparging with 76 degree water then this would work as a mash out (stop the enzymes and thin the sugars)

At 70 degrees beta amylase is still active, so if you were (very!) slow with the sparge then some action would continue.

I use 71 degrees to mash for a full-bodied session beer at under 4%.

Don't go above 76 degrees, but the risk of tanin extraction isn't the same with batch sparging as fly sparging. With fly sparging you try to ensure that the last running are sub 6.0 pH and 1010 (from memory!).

Happy brewing!
Ian

RobP

Re: hot batch sparge = mash out?

Post by RobP » Sat Jun 10, 2017 9:27 pm

patwestlake wrote:greetings pop pickers!

If if batch sparge my BIAB at a higher temperature (70-72?) does this equate to a mash out? I know it won't affect the first runnings, but as they are now heating in the kettle, the temp will get up quickly hence preserving the sugar profile. I seem to recall that there is an upper limit for sparge temperature to leave the tannins in the grains, but what I'm after is guidance/experience of sparge temperature for profiling.

Pat
For batch sparging, go as hot as you like, you won't extract tannins because there's still loads of sugars in solution. No-one worries about extracting tannins when boiling grains for quite a long time when decoction mashing, do they?

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