Gluten free Barley malt syrup

A forum to discuss anything related to making gluten-free versions of those brews that would otherwise be off limits to coeliacs.
oldbloke
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Location: Todmorden, Wet Yorks

Re: Gluten free Barley malt syrup

Post by oldbloke » Mon May 11, 2015 3:10 pm

I imagine they test every batch for either or both of two reasons: legal requirement to keep the GF labelling, and JustInCaseOfLawsuits.
I think the chemistry is pretty reliable.

So, why look for other ways of making GF? I guess like me he loves to tinker.
In August I'm going to malt some millet again...

simon12
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Re: Gluten free Barley malt syrup

Post by simon12 » Mon May 11, 2015 6:28 pm

I am actually looking to start a gluten free micro brewery and gluten free home brew ingredients suppliers and hopefully not make an inferior product. By the way if you want to order gluten free beer westerham brewery sell a good range (I assume clarity fermed and batch tested) not that I want to promote one of my main competitors in GF beer. Also check out the end of this thread 5 mins after I post this for some interesting results viewtopic.php?f=39&t=70574

oldbloke
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Joined: Fri Jul 16, 2010 9:29 am
Location: Todmorden, Wet Yorks

Re: Gluten free Barley malt syrup

Post by oldbloke » Mon May 11, 2015 10:23 pm

I got t'missus a Westerham variety case for her birthday!

simon12
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Re: Gluten free Barley malt syrup

Post by simon12 » Fri May 22, 2015 12:32 pm

After a few more people have tasted these beers my conclusion on both is very positive. The 1st one I am the only person who tasted toffee and everyone liked it, the second was much nicer when it had gone a bit flat I think the CO2 masked the little maltiness that was there and again everyone who tasted it liked it. On there own I think the 1st one could make a good dark copper beer and the 2nd a good IPA or lager and a mixture could make anything in between. I now have all the prices in and hope to be able to have it for sale in around 3 weeks time provisional prices will be:
1st one
1L 1.4Kg Plastic tub £10.50
5L 7Kg Plastic Jerrican £35
20L 28Kg Jerrican £90
2nd German one (I am assuming it has the same L to Kg ratio as the other but will be sold by L except the 20Kg which the weight will be the accurate measurement)
1L 1.4Kg Plastic tub £12.50
5L 7Kg Plastic Jerrican £44
14.3L 20Kg Bucket £95
£6 delivery on any quantity
How does this look?

rpt
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Re: Gluten free Barley malt syrup

Post by rpt » Mon Jun 29, 2015 3:29 pm

Are these available now?

How are they made? Since barley contains gluten, is it removed in a similar way to Clarity Ferm?

simon12
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Re: Gluten free Barley malt syrup

Post by simon12 » Tue Jun 30, 2015 2:17 am

rpt wrote:Are these available now?

How are they made? Since barley contains gluten, is it removed in a similar way to Clarity Ferm?
My knowledge on this is still growing, but a short summary is gluten is a protein present in barley, at every stage of the brewing process protein is significantly removed as it is undesirable in beer though a far higher level than is suitible for those with gluten allergies/intolerance/coeliac is acceptable for anyone else. Due to beer producers wanting to reduce protein many methods have been found with just 1 normally being enough for most beers but 2 or more in combination or 1 used more heavily can reduce the protein levels to make a gluten free beer. Clarity ferm is an enzyme that breaks down protein during fermentation there are similar enzymes that can break down proteins in the mash I assume that these are what is used to produce this extract but I do not know for sure. There are also types of barley that are much lower in protein naturally so its not impossible they just use these. Note also barley does not contain true gluten (soluble gliadin and insoluble glutenin found in wheat) but hordein and in far smaller quantities than in wheat and the entire research into who gets affected by what and why is still in its infancy and I could not possibly even try to explain the intricacies of it. I may or may not be able to elaborate on any of this if you want and note I have no qualifications in any of this and am answering to the best of my own knowledge which could be wrong.

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