Guinness clone. ?

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john luc
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Re: Guinness clone. ?

Post by john luc » Tue Mar 12, 2019 1:47 pm

The problem with chasing a commercial beer recipe is that the recipe itself keeps changing over the years. The 70 20 10 is as good as any recipe. As said canal water was once the source used. Now a days I believe they brew a higher strength beer and dilute it with de aerated water, more energy efficient. Look for the best homebrew recipes is best way to go.
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Silver_Is_Money
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Re: Guinness clone. ?

Post by Silver_Is_Money » Tue Mar 12, 2019 4:39 pm

Thanks again Eric! So it looks like 500L Black Barley would need some additional roasting to get it up to about at least 600L.

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PeeBee
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Re: Guinness clone. ?

Post by PeeBee » Tue Mar 12, 2019 6:19 pm

Silver_Is_Money wrote:
Tue Mar 12, 2019 4:39 pm
Thanks again Eric! So it looks like 500L Black Barley would need some additional roasting to get it up to about at least 600L.
Be careful! "Patent" black malt got patented because it was a process that didn't risk burning the malt house down!



Actually, you could get really "retro" and work on Guinness recipes before they introduced roast barley early in 20th century (as Guinness had established itself as a "dry Irish stout" I, and I'm guessing here, suppose roast barley emphasised that difference - it has a "drier" finish than does black malt - and also tends not to discolour the head like black malt). The grain bill would have been just pale and black malt, no flaked barley either.

Here's a happy hunting ground for old Guinness recipes: https://barclayperkins.blogspot.com/search?q=guinness

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Eric
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Re: Guinness clone. ?

Post by Eric » Tue Mar 12, 2019 6:43 pm

Silver_Is_Money wrote:
Tue Mar 12, 2019 4:39 pm
Thanks again Eric! So it looks like 500L Black Barley would need some additional roasting to get it up to about at least 600L.
In truth I don't know what difference that might make, but it would seem that roasted grains available in the US are, in general, less roasted than their equivalents in UK. As some maltsters spray water to stop roated barley bursting into flame and carbonising as it leaves the kiln, a safer option might be to marginnaly increase the proportion of roasted barley.

A lot of the bitterness is provided by the roast barley, but even so I like it hopped to forty plus IBUs.

Use, if possible, a more true British style yeast than are frequently sold as such.

Using flaked oats for some part of the adjunct portion will make a drinkable oatmeal stout.
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Silver_Is_Money
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Re: Guinness clone. ?

Post by Silver_Is_Money » Tue Mar 12, 2019 7:05 pm

PeeBee wrote:
Tue Mar 12, 2019 6:19 pm
Here's a happy hunting ground for old Guinness recipes: https://barclayperkins.blogspot.com/search?q=guinness
Thanks for the warning and the link PeeBee!

I think i'll just use 500L and be done with it. I can always add 11% or 12% instead of 10%, to introduce more roastiness from that which is somewhat less roasted.

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Eric
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Re: Guinness clone. ?

Post by Eric » Tue Mar 12, 2019 8:56 pm

PeeBee wrote:
Tue Mar 12, 2019 6:19 pm

Actually, you could get really "retro" and work on Guinness recipes before they introduced roast barley early in 20th century (as Guinness had established itself as a "dry Irish stout" I, and I'm guessing here, suppose roast barley emphasised that difference - it has a "drier" finish than does black malt - and also tends not to discolour the head like black malt). The grain bill would have been just pale and black malt, no flaked barley either.
Before Gladstone's so called Free Mash Tun Act in 1880, beer was taxed by duty on malt. Beer made prior then with adjuncts such as flaked and roast barley was forbidden by law. After that date the brewer was free to use an increased range of ingredients and tax was applied at the brewery.
Without patience, life becomes difficult and the sooner it's finished, the better.

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PeeBee
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Re: Guinness clone. ?

Post by PeeBee » Tue Mar 12, 2019 9:17 pm

I got into trouble for mentioning roast barley, Guinness, and use of untaxed adjuncts in the same sentence. Can't remember who I got in trouble with now. But I did have it pointed out that Guinness continued using roast (black) malt for decades after the "free mash tun act". Don't know (or can't remember) the story about flaked barley. So with plenty more to needle the cheapskate makers of Guinness with, I desisted from trying to pin using cheap unmalted barley onto them.

alfie09
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Re: Guinness clone. ?

Post by alfie09 » Tue Mar 12, 2019 9:28 pm

Cheers all

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