leffe brun

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SHIELDS EXILE
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leffe brun

Post by SHIELDS EXILE » Mon Sep 28, 2015 12:02 pm

Has anyone got a recipe for this great Belgian beer, Icant buy any in Australia,but found some in a bar on New Caledonia it was expensive there though. I got agood recipe from someone on Jims, two years ago for Pelforths Brun,,has anyone brewed any?

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seymour
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Re: leffe brun

Post by seymour » Tue Sep 29, 2015 3:07 am

SHIELDS EXILE wrote:Has anyone got a recipe for this great Belgian beer, Icant buy any in Australia,but found some in a bar on New Caledonia it was expensive there though...has anyone brewed any?
I like that beer a lot too, even though it's really just another mass-produced counterfeit of its former self. Still damn tasty though. Here you go:
SHIELDS EXILE wrote:...I got agood recipe from someone on Jims, two years ago for Pelforths Brun...
Yeah, I think that was me. Cheers again! Don't wait another two years.

Leffe Bruin
Brewery: Abbaye de Leffe S.A. in Dinant, Belgium (Abbey brewery founded 1152, commercial production 1952-present, now owned by AB-InBev)
Style: Belgian Dubbel
OG: 1066
ABV: 6.5%
Grainbill: 71.1% Belgian Pilsener Malt, 17.8% Corn Sugar, 6.7% Belgian Aromatic/Biscuit Malt, 4.4% Roasted Barley
Early hops: Hallertau
Late hops: Saaz
IBU: 31
Yeast: Proprietary AB-Inbev-Leffe yeast. Originally a German Weizen yeast, but Wyeast 3463 at cool temp is similar.
Colour: dark brown

P.S. I watched a really cool old French film noir called "Ascenseur Pour L'Echafaud" (Elevator To The Scaffold) with a killer early Miles Davis jazz improvisational soundtrack. Anyway, in one scene the main characters sit at a table outside a cafe, under a Leffe umbrella. Dig it, man. You can't make shit like that up.

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Re: leffe brun

Post by sbond10 » Tue Sep 29, 2015 8:24 am

Nice recipe there Seymour what dry yeast would you suggest. And corn sugar as table white or belgian canDi? Guessing last 15 minute of boil ? Hops would 90 min and 15 min would do
Sorry sheilding excile for all the questiob they may help you abit

bquiggerz

Re: leffe brun

Post by bquiggerz » Tue Sep 29, 2015 8:28 am

Corn sugar is dextrose or brewing suger over here

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Re: leffe brun

Post by sbond10 » Tue Sep 29, 2015 9:11 am

bquiggerz wrote:Corn sugar is dextrose or brewing suger over here
Cheers dude

SHIELDS EXILE
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Re: leffe brun

Post by SHIELDS EXILE » Tue Sep 29, 2015 12:39 pm

Thanks Seymore, I wil make some next week,as soon as I can get the ingredients.

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seymour
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Re: leffe brun

Post by seymour » Tue Sep 29, 2015 1:08 pm

sbond10 wrote:Nice recipe there Seymour what dry yeast would you suggest...
A weizen/weiss strain would be most authentic, such as Safbrew WB-06, Mauribrew Weiss, or Danstar Munich. Safbrew T-58 would be an excellent choice too, but would probably emphasize the Belgian esters and phenols even more than modern Leffe Bruin.
sbond10 wrote:...And corn sugar as table white or belgian canDi? Guessing last 15 minute of boil ?...
bquiggerz wrote:Corn sugar is dextrose or brewing suger over here
Right. Don't overthink it. I guarantee AB-Inbev is not using a fancy, expensive form of sugar. Any ol' cheap white table sugar will do: corn, cane, beet, etc. This is simply a cost-savings, and body-lightener.

You can go ahead and just add the sugar at beginning of boil, giving as much time as possible to caramelize a bit.
sbond10 wrote:...Hops would 90 min and 15 min would do. Sorry sheilding excile for all the questiob they may help you abit
90 minutes is probably longer than AB-Inbev would do, time is money. I would do a first wort addition, boil for 60 minutes, and yes add the late addition with around 15 or 20 minutes remaining.

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Re: leffe brun

Post by sbond10 » Tue Sep 29, 2015 1:25 pm

Aye aye captain will do and cheers shields for posting a excellent recipe request hopefully my questions will have aided you in some way

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Re: leffe brun

Post by super_simian » Wed Sep 30, 2015 2:56 am

seymour wrote:
sbond10 wrote:...And corn sugar as table white or belgian canDi? Guessing last 15 minute of boil ?...
bquiggerz wrote:Corn sugar is dextrose or brewing suger over here
Right. Don't overthink it. I guarantee AB-Inbev is not using a fancy, expensive form of sugar. Any ol' cheap white table sugar will do: corn, cane, beet, etc. This is simply a cost-savings, and body-lightener.
Thanks to our climate, it's actually really hard to get non-cane sugars here in Australia. The only way to find dextrose is at health food or brewing stores. Bigger supermarkets often carry glucose syrup, but it's exxy. I tried getting beet sugar to make 'candi' at one point, but was impossible. Asian/Indian markets sometimes carry funky sugars (palm, coconut) but that's a gamble.

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PhilB
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Re: leffe brun

Post by PhilB » Wed Sep 30, 2015 11:10 am

Hi Seymour

I'm not questioning your research here, but ...
seymour wrote:Grainbill: 71.1% Belgian Pilsener Malt, 17.8% Corn Sugar, 6.7% Belgian Aromatic/Biscuit Malt, 4.4% Roasted Barley
... wot no Special B ? Image

So why does Special B smell so much like Leffe Brun then?

Cheers, PhilB

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Barley Water
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Re: leffe brun

Post by Barley Water » Wed Sep 30, 2015 4:31 pm

Humm....it's been awhile since I have had that beer but I don't remember there being any roast flavors in there. I think if I were going to brew that recipe I would at least cold steep the roast barley or perhaps even use dehusked carafa just to avoid the astringent roast flavors.
Drinking:Saison (in bottles), Belgian Dubbel (in bottles), Oud Bruin (in bottles), Olde Ale (in bottles),
Abbey Triple (in bottles), Munich Helles, Best Bitter (TT Landlord clone), English IPA
Conditioning: Traditional bock bier, CAP
Fermenting: Munich Dunkel
Next up: Bitter (London Pride like), ESB
So many beers to make, so little time (and cold storage space)

SHIELDS EXILE
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Re: leffe brun

Post by SHIELDS EXILE » Thu Oct 01, 2015 11:13 am

I was surprised that you find corn suger hard to find. I buy it in any local super mart, it is maize syrup according to GW,s bok Brew Brityish Ale 1998, pge 16.Iget the local stuff "Queen Corn sYRUP.aLSO TWO US brands, avoiding the one containing vanilla.Or, I would use maize flakes.

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seymour
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Re: leffe brun

Post by seymour » Thu Oct 01, 2015 12:56 pm

super_simian wrote:Thanks to our climate, it's actually really hard to get non-cane sugars here in Australia. The only way to find dextrose is at health food or brewing stores. Bigger supermarkets often carry glucose syrup, but it's exxy. I tried getting beet sugar to make 'candi' at one point, but was impossible. Asian/Indian markets sometimes carry funky sugars (palm, coconut) but that's a gamble.
By all means, use white cane sugar without hesitation. Better yet, getcha some brown cane sugar/turbinado from the supermarket baking aisle. It tastes better than corn or beet sugar anyway. I insist on cane sugar in my own brews.
PhilB wrote:...wot no Special B ? Image

So why does Special B smell so much like Leffe Brun then?
PhilB, perhaps you're right, the only thing Leffe's website says is "dark roasted malt" which is open to interpretation. But the recipe I shared supposedly comes straight from inside brewery information Kristen England gathered while developing BJCP training materials, plus Leffe employee statements on a Dutch brewing site. Take that for what it's worth, wink.

I know the aromas and flavours you mean: toffee, raisin, plum, date, tart cherry, port wine, etc. But Special-B is an expensive trademarked product. Call me cynical, but I can't believe cost-cutting, corner-cutting AB-InBev would use Special-B in a mass-produced global brand. I know from experience you can produce the same effect with a combo of cheaper caramelized sugars, roasty grains, flavour hops, and estery yeast. Of course, anyone who adds Special-B to a homebrewed clone attempt will certainly produce a tastier, more complex Belgian Dubbel.
Barley Water wrote:Humm....it's been awhile since I have had that beer but I don't remember there being any roast flavors in there. I think if I were going to brew that recipe I would at least cold steep the roast barley or perhaps even use dehusked carafa just to avoid the astringent roast flavors.
Barley Water, you should taste Leffe Brown/Brune/Bruin again, it's different. I didn't create that recipe, but I stand by it. That beer is in fact toastier and roastier than most Belgian dark ales, definitely deviating from BJCP guidelines. I have no problem believing the roasted barley contributes colour and flavour. Some people suggest Chocolate Malt, but it doesn't taste chocolately. Some people suggest Black Malt, but it doesn't taste like that to me either. There is a certain sharp, husky grainy, charred taste that I recognize as roasted barley. Here's what I published on Ratebeer back in 2011, even before I had seen this recipe. I bought several 6-packs at the time, I liked it so much.
http://www.ratebeer.com/beer/leffe-brune/2516/ wrote:Tasted from bottle into nucleated tulip glass. Poured an opaque, dark reddish-brown color with creamy, long-lasting beige head with excellent lace. Aroma was grain, bread, toast, roasted barley and nuts, faintly peppery hops and stronger yeast phenolic spice. Flavor was complex and full, grainbill reminiscent of a porter, perfectly balanced malt-sweetness/hops bitterness, lots of fruity notes: raisins, plums, dried cranberries. Medium body, fairly full "chewy" mouthfeel, but on the other hand, the spitzy carbonation gives it a fairly light, "digestible" impression at the same time. Persistent black pepper, clove, nutmeg in the aftertaste. Delicious.

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PhilB
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Re: leffe brun

Post by PhilB » Thu Oct 01, 2015 2:02 pm

Hi Seymour

Thanks for the response ... I genuinely wasn't questioning your research, but thank you for justifying your position anyway, I agree with your stance (especially the cynicism towards AB-InBev :wink: ) ... I guess the point I was hinting at, was that your recipe provides the information SHIELDS EXILE needs if he wants to take a "brew-alike" approach to cloning Leffe Brune :? ... or, as you said (so much more eloquently than me :wink: ) ...
seymour wrote:I know from experience you can produce the same effect with a combo of cheaper caramelized sugars, roasty grains, flavour hops, and estery yeast.
... but if he want's to take a more "taste-alike" approach, then
seymour wrote:anyone who adds Special-B to a homebrewed clone attempt will certainly produce a tastier, more complex Belgian Dubbel.
=D>

Cheers, PhilB

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Re: leffe brun

Post by Barley Water » Thu Oct 01, 2015 8:55 pm

Well ok; it's not like this is the first time I have been wrong. If I get around to it, I may try doing a "leffe like" clone of the blond stuff. I rather like that beer also but it's been several years since I've made that particular style. I anticipate that a beer like that will get judged in the new style category and not have to go up against Triples like used to be the case under the old guidelines (although I have already made a Triple anyhow). Last time I did this beer I used WLP500 and it's been awhile since I've messed with that strain; my go-to for abbey beer is now WLP530, not quite as fruity. Since I could care less about making a clone I'll likely throw some jaggery in the copper; it will add sort of a smooth buttery flavor which I rather fancy (see how I did that? Pretty good for a Texan right?). :D
Drinking:Saison (in bottles), Belgian Dubbel (in bottles), Oud Bruin (in bottles), Olde Ale (in bottles),
Abbey Triple (in bottles), Munich Helles, Best Bitter (TT Landlord clone), English IPA
Conditioning: Traditional bock bier, CAP
Fermenting: Munich Dunkel
Next up: Bitter (London Pride like), ESB
So many beers to make, so little time (and cold storage space)

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