water filter

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chris246810

water filter

Post by chris246810 » Tue Sep 15, 2015 3:53 pm

thinking of purchasing one of these water filters http://www.pozzani.co.uk/water-treatmen ... _info.html for use in my brewing and for drinking water, does anyone have experience of this type of filter? i presume as it removes the chlorine it will be ideal for brewing.

AnthonyUK

Re: water filter

Post by AnthonyUK » Tue Sep 15, 2015 4:03 pm

It says 'Multi-stage carbon, block carbon and ion exchange cartridge' so I'd avoid it for brewing and just look for one without ion exchange as the salt addition can be an issue.

chris246810

Re: water filter

Post by chris246810 » Tue Sep 15, 2015 4:13 pm

Ok ill keep looking, glad I asked before buying it now, there's a whole page on their website about it being ideal for treating home brewing water, rather misleading if it actually isn't suitable.

irv
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Re: water filter

Post by irv » Fri Sep 18, 2015 11:36 am

doesn't the chlorine just gas off as you heat the water for the mash tun? you may have chloramines which wont gas off, you could put it through carbon filter or pre treat with half a tablet of potassium metabisulfite

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vacant
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Re: water filter

Post by vacant » Fri Sep 18, 2015 2:09 pm

irv wrote:you may have chloramines
.
Does anyone have chloramines? Water company customer services/web site will answer that
I brew therefore I ... I .... forget

irv
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Re: water filter

Post by irv » Fri Sep 18, 2015 2:57 pm

vacant wrote:
irv wrote:you may have chloramines
.
Does anyone have chloramines? Water company customer services/web site will answer that
I think it is widely used in the UK.
here is some blurb form a Scottish Water factsheet:
( http://www.scottishwater.co.uk/you-and- ... -explained )
Chloramination is widely practiced in other parts
of the UK to treat public water supplies. As part of
our long term investment programme to improve
water quality for our customers, Scottish Water
are gradually increasing the number of areas in
Scotland being supplied with chloraminated water.

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vacant
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Re: water filter

Post by vacant » Fri Sep 18, 2015 4:53 pm

I emailed the Drinking Water Inspectorate a few hours ago to ask for a list, auto reply said usually 5 days to respond
I brew therefore I ... I .... forget

chris246810

Re: water filter

Post by chris246810 » Sat Sep 19, 2015 11:11 am

Found this water quality report but I don't know how to interpret the info it shows http://www.south-staffs-water.co.uk/dow ... ire_SP.pdf


Says chlorine 0.261mg/l,chloride 50.3 mg/l, doesn't mention chloramine.
The water in my flat doesn't taste very good so I'd like a filter to for. Both drinking and brewing

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Re: water filter

Post by Horden Hillbilly » Sat Sep 19, 2015 11:21 am

I have a Water Gem filter & it's a carbon filter which needs changing every 6 months.

chris246810

Re: water filter

Post by chris246810 » Sat Sep 19, 2015 11:38 am

Yea that's the kind of thing I was after, good price too.

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Re: water filter

Post by vacant » Fri Oct 02, 2015 11:30 am

vacant wrote:I emailed the Drinking Water Inspectorate a few hours ago to ask for a list, auto reply said usually 5 days to respond
Got an answer this morning. I guess this list may change without (public) notice:

Thank you for your enquiry. Water companies where chloramination is practiced for part of their supplies are as follows (note no company uses chloramination for all of its supplies):

Anglian Water
Dee Valley Water
Essex and Suffolk Water
Northumbrian Water
Bournemouth Water
Sutton and East Surrey Water
Severn Trent Water
Thames Water
Yorkshire Water

The following two companies receive supplies of water that are chloraminated as they receive water from one of the companies above but do not chloraminate supplies themselves :-

Affinity Water
Independent Water Networks
I brew therefore I ... I .... forget

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Re: water filter

Post by Fil » Fri Oct 02, 2015 4:21 pm

There is a very comprehensive book on water in the same series as the Chris White Yeast book
http://www.amazon.co.uk/WATER-COMPREHEN ... JS89P5ZM9Y

the mineral content of water is important to brewing and creating the 'ideal' water profile has been going on for a while http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j& ... 7490,d.bGg

standing water for 24 hours after drawing from the tap will allow chlorine to escape, afaik cloromides are less likely to evaporate off..

a standard campden tablet dose of sodium metabisulphate will treat upto 50l iirc for chlorine and chloromides.. which is what i do ;)

I think if you treat your brewing water with a short boil to drive off temporary hardness chlorine and chloromides are also removed by the boil ?? but i would check on that ;)
Water chemistry is a bit too much for me to wrap my simple head round so i use my tap water for bitters and ales treated only with a campden tab, and for lagers or beers that benefit from a softer water i consider buying in 5l bottles from the supermarket ....
ist update for months n months..
Fermnting: not a lot..
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Maturing: Challenger smash, and a kit lager
Drinking: dry one minikeg left in the store
Coming Soon Lots planned for the near future nowt for the immediate :(

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Re: water filter

Post by Aleman » Fri Oct 02, 2015 7:20 pm

Fil wrote:There is a very comprehensive book on water in the same series as the Chris White Yeast book
http://www.amazon.co.uk/WATER-COMPREHEN ... JS89P5ZM9Y
Great if you want to brew beers like the Americans . . .Never had a bad bud :D
Fil wrote:the mineral content of water is important to brewing and creating the 'ideal' water profile has been going on for a while http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j& ... 7490,d.bGg
No such thing as a perfect water profile for a beer, indeed the variations in water profile is one of the things that drove variations in beer styles not only across this country but other countries in the world. The authorities in the US, would like us all to ignore that rich heritage and variation, and brew beer the way they tell us to, and taste the way they tell us it should taste.
Fil wrote:standing water for 24 hours after drawing from the tap will allow chlorine to escape, afaik cloromides are less likely to evaporate off..
Corrrect, it's difficult to get ride of chloramines, and they are formed, not only by the water company actually adding them, but during the waters travels down the pipes.
Fil wrote:a standard campden tablet dose of sodium metabisulphate will treat upto 50l iirc for chlorine and chloromides.. which is what i do ;)
Close, 1 CT will treat 17UK gallons of up to 3mg/l Chloramines
Fil wrote:I think if you treat your brewing water with a short boil to drive off temporary hardness chlorine and chloromides are also removed by the boil ?? but i would check on that ;)
Chloramines are not removed quickly by boiling. In waters with a very high bicarbonate content boiling may not reduce the bicarbonate content as low as required for pale beers.
Fil wrote:Water chemistry is a bit too much for me to wrap my simple head round so i use my tap water for bitters and ales treated only with a campden tab, and for lagers or beers that benefit from a softer water i consider buying in 5l bottles from the supermarket ....
Hmmm :roll:

Water treatment is simple.

Adjust the alkalinity to a level appropriate to the beer style you are brewing
If required adjust the calcium level to a minimum of 75mg/l using a combination of appropriate acids / gypsum / calcium chloride to hit the sulphate to chloride ratio you think is appropriate the beer you are brewing.

Brew the beer, measure the mash pH after 10 minutes, and if it is wildly outside the 5.2-5.8 range (for the particularly anal, 5.2 to 5.4 for pales, 5.5 to 5.8 for darker beers), adjust the treatment for the next time you brew using that grist.

There is a bit more on it here

However all of that is way more than the OP was interested in :D

As long as the only ion exchange that is going on is to exchange cations for hydrogen ions and anions for hydroxide ions then you should be ok using the filter . . . but you may find it stripping out the good stuff and leaving you with water that needs further treatment. Unfortunately the vast majority of ion exchange involved replacing calcium and magnesium ions (Good) with sodium (Bad) and bicarbonate ions (bad) with chloride ions (not so bad).

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