Filtering beer

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Jocky
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Re: Filtering beer

Post by Jocky » Thu Aug 10, 2017 6:18 pm

chris2012 wrote:Yeah, I'm definitely going to add bottling yeast. I've never added yeast before for bottling though, so I'd be interested in any recommendations
on what to use, and rough dosage.
Anything, although Safbrew F2 is made specifically for that purpose, as it's neutral and can only assimilate the basic sugars (i.e. your priming sugar), so no danger of changing the end fermentation sugar profile of the beer.
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Re: Filtering beer

Post by chris2012 » Thu Aug 10, 2017 6:30 pm

Cheers just looked at the instructions:

dosage instructions '2 to 7 g/hl'

Will have to dig out some decent scales!

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Re: Filtering beer

Post by Fil » Fri Aug 11, 2017 8:01 pm

how long did it take to filter a pint?
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Re: Filtering beer

Post by chris2012 » Fri Aug 11, 2017 8:34 pm

The first pint was fast, I was just squeezing that pocket thing, so it probably took < 4mins at a guess? It definitely seemed to become slower after that, with that filter it advises backflushing the filter with clean water, which does seem to help to speed it up again.

I then tried attaching it inline to a corny keg, it slowed down it's output to a trickle (even close to the max pressure, I was using 50psi I think it claims to go to 60psi). So, I definitely really need a larger micron filter prior to it. I've got some 10" water filter housings, but I think they seem to hold too much beer for me, so I might get a 5" filter and something like .45 micron or 1 micron filter to go in it.

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Re: Filtering beer

Post by sbond10 » Sat Aug 12, 2017 7:36 am

Just my two pence worth, I no chill and personally getting more and fed up of dirty looking pints. I can see what's being said with letting it sit after chilling and the proteins dropping out as true. As when I first open the jerry can the first couple of litres is crystal clear then hazy finishing in grey sludge. What would be a solution to this other than not using a no chill cube ?.

Also if I reading this right your suggesting not opening the ball valve tap sticking a length of hose in and drawing it out that way?

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Re: Filtering beer

Post by chris2012 » Sat Aug 12, 2017 8:47 am

" Also if I reading this right your suggesting not opening the ball valve tap sticking a length of hose in and drawing it out that way? " -- That's an interesting point. I had assumed they where still using a hop filter to prevent the cold break going through.

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orlando
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Re: Filtering beer

Post by orlando » Sat Aug 12, 2017 9:17 am

sbond10 wrote:
Sat Aug 12, 2017 7:36 am
What would be a solution to this other than not using a no chill cube ?
Read from the top of the thread. :D All the suggestions about the various stages othe process, if carried out properly, will reduce the haze forming "material". Cut any corners and it won't.Unfortunately no-chill will always be sub prime but if you wait long enough (Stoke's Law) that will fall bright too, as you have noticed. The problem arises if you want to drink it inside a couple of months. :D
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Re: Filtering beer

Post by Eric » Sat Aug 12, 2017 1:29 pm

orlando wrote:
Sat Aug 12, 2017 9:17 am
sbond10 wrote:
Sat Aug 12, 2017 7:36 am
What would be a solution to this other than not using a no chill cube ?
Read from the top of the thread. :D All the suggestions about the various stages othe process, if carried out properly, will reduce the haze forming "material". Cut any corners and it won't.Unfortunately no-chill will always be sub prime but if you wait long enough (Stoke's Law) that will fall bright too, as you have noticed. The problem arises if you want to drink it inside a couple of months. :D
Quite.
The importance of chilling after boiling has long been known. Testings took place in labs of brewers more than a hundred years since to determine optimum chilling rates. The findings depended upon beer style but basically between 7 and 9 second to drop wort from 80C to pitching temperature gave most benefits, not just based on clarity, leading to the introduction and widespread use of counterflow chillers.

Not all homebrewers had such facilities (I still don't but am looking into it) so have cooled the best way they could. The internet is wonderful, but its information travels at a rate regardless of merit, when methods long since disregarded can suddenly reappear with new claimed benefits. Sadly no chill is one.
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Re: Filtering beer

Post by orlando » Sat Aug 12, 2017 5:37 pm

Eric wrote:
Sat Aug 12, 2017 1:29 pm
basically between 7 and 9 second to drop wort from 80C to pitching temperature
:shock: Really, don't you mean minutes? :D
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Re: Filtering beer

Post by Jim » Sat Aug 12, 2017 5:57 pm

It can't take much longer than that for the wort to go from one end of my cfc to the other....
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Re: Filtering beer

Post by chris2012 » Sat Aug 12, 2017 6:20 pm

I've got a plate chiller but never used it before, what temp might the wort come out of that at? I wasn't sure if you had to recirc wort through it more than once.

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Re: Filtering beer

Post by Eric » Sat Aug 12, 2017 6:50 pm

orlando wrote:
Sat Aug 12, 2017 5:37 pm
Eric wrote:
Sat Aug 12, 2017 1:29 pm
basically between 7 and 9 second to drop wort from 80C to pitching temperature
:shock: Really, don't you mean minutes? :D
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Re: Filtering beer

Post by TheSumOfAllBeers » Sat Aug 12, 2017 7:50 pm

I wouldn't write off no chill as a clarity lost cause. I get bright wort into cubes using many of the techniques mentioned above, and even brighter wort into FV by pouring carefully, leaving settled true behind.

Temp control and crashing drops the yeast, and gelatine sorts out the chill haze and most of the other clarity issues.

My beer is often noted for clarity and appearance at brew meet ups and competitions.

To the OP : you may find that you have multiple turbidity issues. Ensure you are eliminating them all at each stage of the process, as it gets harder to deal with e.g. Starch haze once you are past the mash tun.


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Jim
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Re: Filtering beer

Post by Jim » Sat Aug 12, 2017 8:15 pm

chris2012 wrote:
Sat Aug 12, 2017 6:20 pm
I've got a plate chiller but never used it before, what temp might the wort come out of that at? I wasn't sure if you had to recirc wort through it more than once.
Mine goes in straight from the boiler and comes out at 20C. In fact it's possible to get it colder - I have the cooling water flow at just a trickle (obviously it depends on the temperature of the tap water as well).
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Re: Filtering beer

Post by chris2012 » Sat Aug 12, 2017 8:47 pm

Oooh awesome! I will definitely use the plate chiller next time then. For some reason I never got round to using it.

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