Re: Old Beers & Brewing

Try some of these great recipes out, or share your favourite brew with other forumees!
Dave.T
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Re: Old Beers & Brewing

Post by Dave.T » Wed Mar 28, 2018 5:59 pm

Hello Edd,
Not looked on for a few day's, thanks for posting the Northgate pale Ale recipe.
Dave

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Re: Old Beers & Brewing

Post by lord.president » Sun Jun 24, 2018 11:30 am

Hi. Have you managed to get any Carlisle State Management recipes? Anybody of my Dads age raves about the brown ale and l’d like to have a go whilst he’s still around.
Ta
Getting Carlisle United into the First Division,is possibly the greatest football achievement of all time-Bill Shankly

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Re: Old Beers & Brewing

Post by lord.president » Sun Jun 24, 2018 8:42 pm

There’s a local brewery recreated State bitter from the head brewers book, and a few from Whitwell&Marks in Kendal.
My granny worked in various bars around Carlisle, there were two full bottles of State bitter and Brown in her cabinet for years. I went to have a look on my ‘Aunty’s annual Christmas’ visit, and my aunt had thrown them out. Gutted!
Getting Carlisle United into the First Division,is possibly the greatest football achievement of all time-Bill Shankly

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HTH1975
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Re: Old Beers & Brewing

Post by HTH1975 » Sun Oct 21, 2018 5:35 pm

Some great recipes here - loving it. So back in t’ day were they adding hops to each barrel? (i.e. as dry hops).

RobP
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Re: Old Beers & Brewing

Post by RobP » Sun Oct 21, 2018 8:16 pm

HTH1975 wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 5:35 pm
Some great recipes here - loving it. So back in t’ day were they adding hops to each barrel? (i.e. as dry hops).
Until Edd comes along with a better answer...

Having read a few brewing history books, and followed some blogs it appears that brewing records don't always detail dry hopping practices but the available information implies it was often done but the amounts of dry hops used were fairly low compared to modern practices, 1/2lb or so per barrel. High quality hops like Kent hops or continental varieties were usually used for late or dry hops.

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HTH1975
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Re: Old Beers & Brewing

Post by HTH1975 » Sun Oct 21, 2018 10:17 pm

RobP wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 8:16 pm
HTH1975 wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 5:35 pm
Some great recipes here - loving it. So back in t’ day were they adding hops to each barrel? (i.e. as dry hops).
Until Edd comes along with a better answer...

Having read a few brewing history books, and followed some blogs it appears that brewing records don't always detail dry hopping practices but the available information implies it was often done but the amounts of dry hops used were fairly low compared to modern practices, 1/2lb or so per barrel. High quality hops like Kent hops or continental varieties were usually used for late or dry hops.
Thanks for your reply, but I meant more whether they were adding dry hops to each barrel individually, or to the entire gyle prior to racking.

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Re: Old Beers & Brewing

Post by RobP » Sun Oct 21, 2018 11:01 pm

HTH1975 wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 10:17 pm
RobP wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 8:16 pm
HTH1975 wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 5:35 pm
Some great recipes here - loving it. So back in t’ day were they adding hops to each barrel? (i.e. as dry hops).
Until Edd comes along with a better answer...

Having read a few brewing history books, and followed some blogs it appears that brewing records don't always detail dry hopping practices but the available information implies it was often done but the amounts of dry hops used were fairly low compared to modern practices, 1/2lb or so per barrel. High quality hops like Kent hops or continental varieties were usually used for late or dry hops.
Thanks for your reply, but I meant more whether they were adding dry hops to each barrel individually, or to the entire gyle prior to racking.
The beer would have been given a short time to settle out after fermentation, either in the square or possibly several squares were mixed into settling tanks, then was racked to trade casks and dry-hopped. Getting the beer clear with as much CO2 in as possible was kind of the point of Yorkshire squares.
No mention of hopping but a good description of what went on...
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf ... .tb02139.x

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HTH1975
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Re: Old Beers & Brewing

Post by HTH1975 » Mon Oct 22, 2018 9:29 am

RobP wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 11:01 pm
HTH1975 wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 10:17 pm
RobP wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 8:16 pm


Until Edd comes along with a better answer...

Having read a few brewing history books, and followed some blogs it appears that brewing records don't always detail dry hopping practices but the available information implies it was often done but the amounts of dry hops used were fairly low compared to modern practices, 1/2lb or so per barrel. High quality hops like Kent hops or continental varieties were usually used for late or dry hops.
Thanks for your reply, but I meant more whether they were adding dry hops to each barrel individually, or to the entire gyle prior to racking.
The beer would have been given a short time to settle out after fermentation, either in the square or possibly several squares were mixed into settling tanks, then was racked to trade casks and dry-hopped. Getting the beer clear with as much CO2 in as possible was kind of the point of Yorkshire squares.
No mention of hopping but a good description of what went on...
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf ... .tb02139.x
Thank you for the link - some interesting points in there.

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Eric
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Re: Old Beers & Brewing

Post by Eric » Mon Oct 22, 2018 10:09 am

The only figure I have seen was for 2 ounces per barrel.
R0010302.JPG
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Re: Old Beers & Brewing

Post by HTH1975 » Mon Oct 22, 2018 11:28 am

Eric wrote:
Mon Oct 22, 2018 10:09 am
The only figure I have seen was for 2 ounces per barrel.

R0010302.JPG
Thanks for that. My speculation is more whether they added the dry hops to each barrel. Back in t’ day they used a ‘barrel’ as a standard measurement, so 2oz/barrel is more of a measure of the rate at which the dry hops were added to each overall gyle.

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HTH1975
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Re: Old Beers & Brewing

Post by HTH1975 » Mon Oct 22, 2018 11:29 am

Regarding dry hopping as a historic thing, there is certainly evidence for this in many recipes on Ron Pattison’s blog.

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Eric
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Re: Old Beers & Brewing

Post by Eric » Mon Oct 22, 2018 2:26 pm

HTH1975 wrote:
Mon Oct 22, 2018 11:28 am
Eric wrote:
Mon Oct 22, 2018 10:09 am
The only figure I have seen was for 2 ounces per barrel.

R0010302.JPG
Thanks for that. My speculation is more whether they added the dry hops to each barrel. Back in t’ day they used a ‘barrel’ as a standard measurement, so 2oz/barrel is more of a measure of the rate at which the dry hops were added to each overall gyle.
No, if I understand you correctly, that was the quantity of hops added to each wooden barrel in proportion to it's capacity. Probably at that time (early 1945) most barrels would be 36 gallon. Firkins would be few, containing a very small proportion of the brew and I would suspect most beer would be casked in Butts (with 12 oz) and Tuns with a pound and a half of hops.
Without patience, life becomes difficult and the sooner it's finished, the better.

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HTH1975
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Re: Old Beers & Brewing

Post by HTH1975 » Mon Oct 22, 2018 2:59 pm

Eric wrote:
Mon Oct 22, 2018 2:26 pm
HTH1975 wrote:
Mon Oct 22, 2018 11:28 am
Eric wrote:
Mon Oct 22, 2018 10:09 am
The only figure I have seen was for 2 ounces per barrel.

R0010302.JPG
Thanks for that. My speculation is more whether they added the dry hops to each barrel. Back in t’ day they used a ‘barrel’ as a standard measurement, so 2oz/barrel is more of a measure of the rate at which the dry hops were added to each overall gyle.
No, if I understand you correctly, that was the quantity of hops added to each wooden barrel in proportion to it's capacity. Probably at that time (early 1945) most barrels would be 36 gallon. Firkins would be few, containing a very small proportion of the brew and I would suspect most beer would be casked in Butts (with 12 oz) and Tuns with a pound and a half of hops.
Ahh, yes - we’re on the same page. Very interesting that they dry hopped in the cask, as I’d suspected.

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Re: Old Beers & Brewing

Post by RobP » Mon Oct 22, 2018 3:28 pm

Eric wrote:
Mon Oct 22, 2018 2:26 pm
HTH1975 wrote:
Mon Oct 22, 2018 11:28 am
Eric wrote:
Mon Oct 22, 2018 10:09 am
The only figure I have seen was for 2 ounces per barrel.

R0010302.JPG
Thanks for that. My speculation is more whether they added the dry hops to each barrel. Back in t’ day they used a ‘barrel’ as a standard measurement, so 2oz/barrel is more of a measure of the rate at which the dry hops were added to each overall gyle.
No, if I understand you correctly, that was the quantity of hops added to each wooden barrel in proportion to it's capacity. Probably at that time (early 1945) most barrels would be 36 gallon. Firkins would be few, containing a very small proportion of the brew and I would suspect most beer would be casked in Butts (with 12 oz) and Tuns with a pound and a half of hops.
Don't forget 1945 was during the worse of wartime/post war austerity. Nothing brewing-wise was typical at that time.

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Re: Old Beers & Brewing

Post by RobP » Mon Oct 22, 2018 3:31 pm

HTH1975 wrote:
Mon Oct 22, 2018 2:59 pm
Eric wrote:
Mon Oct 22, 2018 2:26 pm
HTH1975 wrote:
Mon Oct 22, 2018 11:28 am


Thanks for that. My speculation is more whether they added the dry hops to each barrel. Back in t’ day they used a ‘barrel’ as a standard measurement, so 2oz/barrel is more of a measure of the rate at which the dry hops were added to each overall gyle.
No, if I understand you correctly, that was the quantity of hops added to each wooden barrel in proportion to it's capacity. Probably at that time (early 1945) most barrels would be 36 gallon. Firkins would be few, containing a very small proportion of the brew and I would suspect most beer would be casked in Butts (with 12 oz) and Tuns with a pound and a half of hops.
Ahh, yes - we’re on the same page. Very interesting that they dry hopped in the cask, as I’d suspected.
Beer preservation, diastatic effect of hops helping condition, hops sinking through the beer taking other small particles with them and helping beer clear.

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